• This Day In History

2017 Yeni lez porno

2017 Events

  • Author: History.com Editors

From the inauguration of Donald Trump to the first total solar eclipse to traverse the Lower 48 in nearly a century, 2017 was a year for the history books. Here we review the biggest news in politics, culture and science this year.

Trump’s inauguration : After a divisive election season, Donald Trump officially became the 45th President of the United States on January 20, 2017. In a 16-minute inaugural address (the shortest since Jimmy Carter ‘s in 1977), Trump repeated his “America First” campaign slogan in which he delivered a dark-toned nationalist, populist message.

The slogan “America First” has its origins in the America First Committee, a group founded in 1940 to oppose U.S. involvement in World War II that was often characterized by its anti-Semitic, pro-fascist rhetoric.

In his address, Trump embraced the legacy of Andrew Jackson , America’s seventh president, and the first to win on an “anti-establishment” populist platform.

Tough talk on immigration : Shortly after taking office in January, President Trump sought to make good on his “America First” campaign promise by imposing a series of contentious travel bans on citizens from several Muslim-majority nations.

Federal district courts struck down implementation of the bans, though a Supreme Court ruling in December 2017 reversed the lower courts’ decisions, allowing the administration to fully implement the bans.

Trump also continued to promote his election campaign idea of a border wall with Mexico that he says will help quell illegal immigration from Mexico and points south.

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Fired FBI director James Comey being sworn into a crucial Senate hearing, repeating explosive allegations that President Donald Trump badgered him over the highly sensitive investigation Russia's meddling in the 2016 election. (Credit: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia’s election meddling : The Office of the Director of National Intelligence reported in January 2017 that the Russian government had ordered an influence campaign aimed at the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

In March, FBI director James Comey announced that the FBI was investigating election hacks and links between the Trump campaign and Russia. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the head of the United States Department of Justice , recused himself from any investigation into the President’s campaign amid questions over his contact with the Russian ambassador in 2016.

President Trump fired Comey in May, making Comey just the second FBI director ever to be dismissed by the President. (The first was William S. Sessions, who was fired by President Bill Clinton in 1993 after being accused of tax evasion.)

Later in May, the FBI announced a special counsel, led by former FBI director Robert Mueller , to investigate any coordination between the Russian government and the Trump campaign.

Fights over Obamacare : Republicans and Democrats in the House of Representatives and Senate sparred over whether to repeal President Obama’s signature Affordable Care Act .

The GOP, in control of both the House and Senate for the first time since 2006, made it a legislative priority to dismantle the healthcare bill, yet a series of Republican plans to repeal and replace the legislation ultimately failed.

Rohingya refugee crisis: In late August, Myanmar stepped up attacks against the Rohingya, a mostly Muslim ethnic minority in Buddhist-majority Myanmar, in what a United Nations commissioner called a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” As a result, more than 600,000 Rohingya refugees fled across the border into neighboring Bangladesh, leading to a humanitarian crisis in that country.

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An undated picture released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on September 16, 2017 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un inspecting a launching drill of the medium-and-long range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 at an undisclosed location. (Credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

North Korean missile launch: North Korea launched a ballistic missile over Japan in August, stepping up tensions between Pyongyang and Washington . North Korean state media said the launch was a prelude to more military actions aimed at the U.S. territory of Guam, a small island in the Western Pacific home to two U.S. military bases.

U.S.-backed forces take Raqqa : After a four-month fight, the ISIS “capital” of Raqqa fell to a U.S.-backed coalition of Syrian forces, ending three years of ISIS control in the Syrian city. The defeat carried symbolic weight as the second major loss of territory for the Islamic State in three months. In July, ISIS troops were pushed out of the Iraqi city of Mosul.

Women’s rights : In January, the Women’s March on Washington , which advocated for policies regarding women’s rights and other issues, became one of the largest single-day demonstrations in U.S. history.

The Washington Post estimated that more than 5 million people may have attended 653 marches in U.S. cities, rivaling participation in the Vietnam War Moratorium Days of 1969 and 1970.

Later, women of the #MeToo movement, a social media campaign to raise awareness about sexual harassment and assault, would be named Time magazine’s Person of the Year, after helping take down a number of pop culture’s most powerful men.

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Super Bowl comeback : The New England Patriots mounted the largest comeback in Super Bowl history to beat the Atlanta Falcons in overtime after trailing by 25 points in the third quarter.

NFL anthem protests : During the 2017 football season, several National Football League players remained kneeling during the national anthem in silent protest of racial bias, violence and profiling by police forces around the country. President Trump attacked the players on Twitter, sparking a further wave of protest by NFL players.

Snapchat IPO : In one of the biggest and most highly anticipated U.S. market debuts in recent years, the image messaging service Snapchat began trading publicly on the New York Stock Exchange in March. After the IPO, Snapchat stocks rose from $17 to $27 in its first two days of trading, before falling 30 percent in subsequent weeks.

“Fake” news : In September, Facebook announced that they had shut down nearly 500 fake “troll” accounts and pages created by Russian company the Internet Research Agency. The Russian company, linked to the Kremlin, purchased more than 3,000 divisive ads on hot-button social issues during and after the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign.

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The statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in the center of Emancipation Park the day after the Unite the Right rally devolved into violence August 13, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The Charlottesville City Council voted to remove the statue and change the name of the space from Lee Park to Emancipation Park, sparking protests from white nationalists, neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan and members of the 'alt-right.' (Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Confederate monuments fall : White supremacists marched in Charlottesville, Virginia , in August to protest the city’s plan to remove a statue of Confederate Army commander Robert E. Lee . One woman was killed and many more injured while protesting the white nationalist rally.

In the wake of Charlottesville, monuments of Lee, “Stonewall” Jackson and other confederate figures were removed from public spaces around the country.

Las Vegas shooting : On October 1, gunman Stephen Paddock opened fire on a crowd of concertgoers at the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival on the Las Vegas Strip from the 32nd floor of the nearby Mandalay Bay Hotel.

Paddock killed 58 people and wounded more than 500. News outlets called it the deadliest mass shooting in recent American history. The shooting reignited debate about gun control and Second Amendment rights.

Health, Science and Environment

Opioid epidemic : Public health officials announced that drug overdoses have become the leading cause of death for Americans under age 50, with more than two-thirds of those deaths coming from opioid painkillers . President Trump declared the opioid crisis a “public health emergency” in October.

Artificial intelligence : Facebook’s artificial intelligence (AI) research program announced over the summer that its “chatbots” not only developed their own language, but also figured out a way to deceive the humans. This prompted a social media scuffle between tech billionaire Elon Musk and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg over the potential dangers of AI.

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Defiant Dakota Access Pipeline water protectors faced-off with various law enforcement agencies on the day the camp was slated to be raided. Many protesters and independent journalist, who were all threatened with multiple felony charges if they didn't leave were met with militarized police on the road abutting the camp. (Credit: Michael Nigro/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Pipeline protests squelched : Shortly after taking office, Donald Trump signed orders clearing the way for the controversial Keystone XL and Dakota Access Pipelines. The move was an effort to expand U.S. energy infrastructure and rollback Obama-era environmental regulations.

Paris climate agreement : The Trump administration delivered official notice in August that the United States would stop participating in the Paris Agreement on climate change.

The Paris Agreement, which was negotiated by 196 countries in 2015, details the steps each country will take to respond to the threat of global climate change .

Syria announced in November that it would join the landmark pact, leaving the United States the planet’s lone holdout.

Record-setting hurricane season : The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, which included 17 named storms and 10 hurricanes, may go down as the costliest hurricane season ever. In the United States alone, hurricanes caused more than $2 billion in 2017.

In August, Hurricane Harvey slammed the Gulf Coast of Texas , dropping more than 50 inches of rain on Houston. A few weeks later, Hurricane Irma, which destroyed more than 95 percent of the buildings on the tiny Caribbean island of Barbuda before steamrolling the Florida Keys, became the most intense hurricane to make U.S. landfall since Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico in late September, leaving large swaths of the U.S. commonwealth without electricity for months.

Wildfires across the globe : In the western United States, Canada and Alaska , wildfires scorched millions of acres in a devastating wildfire season (only 2015 had worse wildfires). Fires also raged across Chile, South Africa, Portugal, Australia, New Zealand and—somewhat ironically—Greenland, where peat and permafrost are drying out because of climate change.

Solar eclipse : On August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse crossed the United States from coast to coast, the first total solar eclipse to do so since 1918. The next total solar eclipse visible from the U.S. mainland will take place in 2024.

The wild inauguration of Andrew Jackson, Trump’s populist predecessor; The New York Times . A short history of ‘America First’; The Atlantic . Person of the Year 2017: The Silence Breakers; Time . This is what we learned counting the women’s marches; Washington Post . The U.S. is now the only country not part of the Paris climate agreement after Syria signs on; USA Today . The most expensive U.S. hurricane season ever: By the numbers; Bloomberg . This is how much of the world is currently on fire. Popular Science . A ‘Massive’ Wildfire Is Now Blazing In Greenland. NPR . How much did climate change affect California’s wildfires? Depends on where you are. Vox Media . Darker and more dangerous: High Commissioner updates the Human Rights Council on human rights issues in 40 countries. United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights .

FACT CHECK: We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn't look right, click here to contact us!

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17 stories that defined 2017

By Cydney Adams

December 20, 2017 / 7:09 PM / CBS News

As each year comes to an end, news outlets across the globe inevitably look back on the months that have passed and reflect on the stories that most impacted our lives. In 2016 , those retrospectives were dominated by the presidential election and political strife that consumed not only the United States, but the world. 

But in 2017, it's nearly impossible to pinpoint any one defining story -- or even to remember all the high and low points of this whirlwind of a year. We saw the after-effects of last year play out in real time, at almost too fast a pace to keep up. Not only was the bombardment of news relentless, the headlines quite literally multiplied in magnitude and scope. We witnessed not one massively destructive hurricane, but three in a row ; two  horrific massacres back to back; a spate of vehicle attacks in Europe and at home; and endless political infighting at the speed of Twitter.

Through it all, we also saw the resiliency of the human spirit. Neighbors and strangers alike stepped in to help someone in need, whether they had lost their home in Houston or a loved one in Las Vegas. And as we head into 2018, we're sure to see more of the same compassion and care.

Here are 17 stories that dominated 2017, and whose impact will continue to be felt in the years to come.

1. President Donald Trump's tweets

"I'm going to be very restrained, if I use [Twitter] at all, I'm going to be very restrained," then President-elect Donald Trump told 60 Minutes' Lesley Stahl  in his first TV interview just days after winning the U.S. election. But his activity on the social media site was anything but restrained during his first year in office.

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Mr. Trump has poked fun at world leaders including the dictator of North Korea, railed against the mainstream media , and sent out dozens of typos like the infamous " covfefe " to nearly 45 million followers. He implied there might be tapes of his White House conversations , attacked numerous sitting lawmakers, shocked  global allies , and announced major policy changes . He's gotten into hot water over retweets from accounts belonging to alt-right activists and anti-Muslim  extremist groups .

#FraudNewsCNN #FNN pic.twitter.com/WYUnHjjUjg — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 2, 2017

Each Trump tweet seemed to spark a frenzied media cycle analyzing their meaning and impact. The president says he likes using Twitter because it allows him to speak directly to the American people, without the involvement of the press. "The tweet speaks for itself" became a predictable response from first White House press secretary Sean Spicer and his successor, Sarah Huckabee Sanders. One year in, there are no signs President Trump plans on slowing down.

2. The Women's March

One day after President Trump's inauguration, hundreds of thousands of people descended on Washington, D.C. for the  Women's March , and many more took to the streets in cities across all 50 states as well as dozens of countries abroad.

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At the flagship march in D.C., a star-studded line up kicked off the day's events. Many marchers wore pink " pussy hats ," designed to reclaim the president's vulgar use of the term on the  2005 Access Hollywood tape . While organizers said the day was not about being anti-Trump, critics felt it excluded conservative women and would lead to little positive change. But for one day at least, the turnout was a massive show of solidarity among women (and men) across the globe.

3. Harvey Weinstein allegations and the #MeToo movement

Bombshell reports in October from  The New York Times  and  The New Yorker  exposed allegations of Harvey Weinstein's sexual misconduct in Hollywood. Although he has denied any nonconsensual encounters, dozens of women have accused the producer of sexual harassment and assault. 

The revelations revealed a deeply rooted problem in Hollywood and beyond of men using their power and influence to take advantage of women. As more women felt empowered to come forward, more prominent men lost their jobs -- including actor Kevin Spacey; comedian Louis C.K.; journalists Charlie Rose and Matt Lauer; and politicians Al Franken and John Conyers. 

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This  watershed moment  sparked an ongoing national conversation about sexual misconduct and power dynamics in the workplace. The hashtag  #MeToo  went viral as millions of people took to social media to share their experiences.

4. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria

Hurricane season in 2017 was particularly brutal for the southeastern U.S. and Caribbean.  Hurricane Harvey  left a path of destruction in Houston and surrounding areas of Texas as well as Louisiana. Record-breaking downpours left entire towns underwater, including small farm communities like  Winnie, Texas .

The nation barely had time to rally around the victims before  Hurricane Irma  made landfall in Florida, also causing severe damage in Puerto Rico on the way. 

Then when  Hurricane Maria  made landfall in  Puerto Rico  at the end of September, power was knocked out to the entire U.S. territory and millions of residents -- who are U.S. citizens -- struggled to find clean drinking water and safe shelter. With  communications down  and major roadways destroyed,  aid couldn't reach large portions of the population .

People are understandably furious about the power outage at @ATLairport - but know this: Sunday in Puerto Rico 88 days after Maria Status.pr reports: *69% power generation (Thousands of Americans have been without power for nearly 3 months; it may be May before everyone has it) — David Begnaud (@DavidBegnaud) December 17, 2017

Three months later, 30 percent of the island is still without electricity and nearly 250,000 people have sought refuge in Florida, CBS News' David Begnaud reports.

5. The Russia investigation

U.S. intelligence agencies determined last year that Russians interfered with the presidential election . But the question lingers, was there any collusion with the Trump campaign? The resulting investigation has been a cloud hovering over the Trump administration since Day 1. Then-FBI Director James Comey was leading a probe into the matter when Trump suddenly fired him . As a result, special counsel Robert Mueller was appointed to oversee the investigation.

Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and former national security advisor Michael Flynn have both been criminally charged (Flynn pleaded guilty), along with two other campaign aides. 

And let's not forget the time Donald Trump, Jr. tweeted out his email exchanges  setting up a meeting with a Russian lawyer who claimed to have damaging information about Hillary Clinton. Trump and his team continue to insist there was no collusion with Russia, but the investigation is likely nowhere near over.

6. James Comey's firing and testimony

The former FBI director was fired in May after months of investigating possible Russia connections. It was a nearly unprecedented political drama that left many government figures questioning the president's motives. The White House's first explanation was a letter from deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein saying Comey had poorly handled the probe into Hillary Clinton's emails. 

Then President Trump undermined that argument by telling NBC's Lester Holt that  he'd planned to fire Comey all along , and he "had the Russia thing" on his mind when he did it. 

Shortly after he left the FBI, Comey leaked a memo on his conversations with Mr. Trump about the investigation into Flynn -- leading to speculation about whether or not the president's actions amounted to obstruction of justice. 

All of this built up over a matter of weeks, so when Comey was called to testify on Capitol Hill, anticipation was running high. Bars in Washington, D.C. opened early for testimony watch parties. The major networks all carried special reports. 

Ultimately, Comey's public testimony didn't reveal any smoking guns, but there were some  shocking moments . He explained he took notes during his conversations with the president because he was afraid Trump might "lie about the nature of our meeting." He revealed that the Justice Department asked him to use softer language about the probe into Clinton's emails during the campaign. And he left social media with a one-liner that will be immortalized in meme-dom forever: "Lordy, I hope there are tapes."

7. White House hirings and firings

President Trump's administration has seen a considerable amount of high-profile staff turnover during its first year. The first to go was former national security advisor Mike Flynn in February, just 25 days into the term, after it was revealed he lied about his contact with the Russian government. He was also a registered foreign agent for the government of Turkey. He recently plead guilty to lying to the FBI. 

Next was James Comey's firing in May .

Then, a whirlwind series of exits over the course of 10 days in July, when  Anthony Scaramucci  was brought in as the new communications director and press secretary Sean Spicer and chief of staff Reince Priebus quickly left the White House. Then Scaramucci himself got the boot after an  explosive phone call to a high-profile journalist  reportedly angered the new chief of staff, General John Kelly. 

Chief strategist  in August, returning to his post at Breitbart. In September, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price resigned over his use of  private charter planes . Most recently, reality star Omarosa Manigualt Newman left her White House public liaison job, reportedly in dramatic fashion .

8. The solar eclipse

In a year that was particularly polarizing, the sun and moon provided a welcome distraction this summer when the  solar eclipse  captivated the nation. Millions of Americans traveled and camped out to be within the path of totality, which stretched from Oregon to South Carolina. 

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Although the event itself only lasted for one hour and 33 minutes, the weeks and days of excitement leading up to it gave Americans something positive and uplifting to look forward to. Gone for a moment were the Twitter hot-takes and political bickering. The eclipse was just cool, and that's something we could all agree on -- even if only for a day.

9. Violent rally in Charlottesville, Virginia 

In August, groups of neo-Nazis and white supremacists gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia to protest the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee from a park at the University of Virginia. A rally was planned for Saturday, August 12th, but the night before hundreds of men marched through the school's grounds with tiki torches chanting phrases like "Jews will not replace us" and the Nazi slogan, "blood and soil." The demonstration only foreshadowed the dark events of the next day , when the supremacist groups clashed violently with anti-fascists and counter-protesters.

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Police called off the event, and as protesters left the scene a white supremacist drove a car into the crowd, injuring dozens and killing a peaceful protester named Heather Heyer .

The events of the weekend left the country shaken and searching for answers. When President Trump finally addressed what happened, his words did little to promote healing. "," Trump said in a press conference three days later. He soon added there were "very fine people on both sides." His choice of words ignited a firestorm of criticism, and left the country once again grappling with how to talk about race, bigotry, and the legacy of segregation in America today.

10. NFL players kneel during national anthem

Colin Kaepernick's protest on the NFL sidelines had mostly faded from the national spotlight until September, when President Trump spoke about it at a rally in Alabama . "Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, "Get that son of a b---- off the field right now,'" Trump asked the crowd, which responded with loud cheers.

Players, coaches, and team owners across the league denounced the president's statement  and defended players' rights to express their views.

The next weekend, the national anthem at the start of each game was almost more hyped than the games themselves. More than 200 NFL players kneeled in a show of solidarity . The Pittsburgh Steelers voted as a team to sit out the anthem all together, while the entire Dallas Cowboys lineup  kneeled on the 50-yard line before their game began.

In early October, Vice President Mike Pence left an Indianapolis Colts game after some players took a knee. He said it was a matter of patriotism and respect, but critics called it a taxpayer funded publicity stunt.

Supporters of the kneeling protests say the gesture is intended to call attention to police brutality and the unequal treatment of black citizens in America, but detractors believe kneeling during the anthem is disrespectful to those who have fought and died for our country.

11. Tensions with North Korea

North Korea  has launched 23 missiles in 16 different tests in the months since Donald Trump took office.  The most recent test , in late November, was of a ballistic missile that could reach the U.S. mainland. Kim Jong Un appears to be making major strides in his nuclear program, and the uptick in test launches prompted Trump to dub him " Little Rocket Man ."

The president has a knack for giving nicknames to his opponents -- Little Marco, Crooked Hillary -- but it is unusual for a sitting U.S. president to openly mock another country's leader, especially on Twitter. Kim has taken his own shots in the war of words,  calling Mr. Trump a "dotard"  and a "destroyer," while also threatening retaliation for the president's insults.

Why would Kim Jong-un insult me by calling me "old," when I would NEVER call him "short and fat?" Oh well, I try so hard to be his friend - and maybe someday that will happen! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 12, 2017

While the back-and-forth may seem silly,  the potential diplomatic consequences are serious . Trump has repeatedly said the U.S. will "handle" the situation, and called on countries like China to place stricter sanctions on North Korea. But defense experts now believe that with the latest test, Kim is closing in on the ability to strike anywhere in the world.

12. Mass shootings in Las Vegas and Sutherland Springs, Texas

On October 1st, the country was horrified by the news of 58 people shot dead at an outdoor country music festival in  Las Vegas , Nevada. The gunman rained  thousands of bullets  down on the unsuspecting crowd from his perch on the 32nd floor of the  Mandalay Bay hotel . He was found dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, surrounded by an arsenal of weapons.

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It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, exceeding even the  Pulse nightclub attack  in Orlando just last year.  Just 35 days later , another horrific shooting claimed the lives of  26 people in a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas . The youngest victim was just 18 months old; the oldest was 77.

It was later revealed that the shooter had previously escaped from a mental health facility, and was discharged form the Air Force for bad conduct for assaulting his spouse and child. That information was never reported to the FBI,  which would have prevented him from buying a gun . The tragic loss of so many lives once again sparked debate on  gun laws  in America and what can be done to stem the violence.

13. Terror attacks around the world

A terrifying trend in terror attacks that began in 2016 continued into this year with assailants using cars as weapons. Six people were killed in March when a man drove a car into pedestrians on the  Westminster Bridge in London , then barreled into the gates of the nearby House of Parliament. 

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That was the first of three car attacks in London this year -- in June a terrorist sped into crowds on the  London Bridge , and days later another attacker  plowed through a group  of worshipers leaving a mosque. In August, a similar attack took place on the Las Ramblas promenade in  Barcelona , Spain, killing 16. And in October, an assailant in New York City killed eight people when he drove a rented Home Depot truck into the crowd on a popular  bike path in lower Manhattan . 

This year also saw the horrific bombing at an  Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England . Twenty-two people were killed, many of them young girls and parents picking their children up from the show.

14. President Trump's travel ban

One week after he took office, President Trump issued an executive order placing strict travel restrictions on people coming to the U.S. from seven predominantly Muslim countries -- Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The resulting chaos at airports around the country caused massive protests and sent lawyers rushing to defend detained travelers.

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The ban was halted by a federal judge within a week, tying it up in the court system. A second version was released in March that was also partially blocked. However, the Supreme Court later ruled part of the ban could go into effect, and in December allowed the third version to go through while it faces ongoing legal challenges. This third version restricts access from eight countries -- Chad, Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Yemen, North Korea, and certain travelers from Venezuela. 

15. Major votes on health care and tax reform

Two key Trump campaign promises faced decisive votes this year. First was the Republican Party's pledge to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. The House was able to pass their version of a plan to dismantle the ACA, but it was unpopular with the public and the Congressional Budget Office estimated  upwards of 30 million more people would be uninsured by 2026. Republican leadership, including President Trump, lobbied for weeks to get the votes needed to pass the repeal in the Senate. Ultimately, seven Republicans voted against the Senate's version, with Sen. John McCain -- recently diagnosed with cancer -- delivering a dramatic "thumbs-down"  on its way to defeat.

In the final days of the year, Republicans in the Senate and the House passed their massive tax overhaul plan. The plan faced criticism from Democrats who say it's a tax cut for the rich and corporations, but supporters say it will boost the economy and help the middle class. President Trump, who long promised a "big, beautiful tax cut," signed the bill into law before Christmas.

16. Special election in Alabama

It's rare that a special election for a congressional seat in a heavily red (or blue) state dominates national media attention. But the entire country was watching the race between Democrat Doug Jones and Republican Roy Moore in Alabama -- a state that hasn't had a Democratic senator in 25 years.

Moore was accused of sexual misconduct by at least seven women, including some who said they were teenagers when the incidents happened. At first, Republican lawmakers distanced themselves from Moore and many  called for him to drop out of the race . But Moore denied the allegations and refused to step aside.

The people of Alabama will do the right thing. Doug Jones is Pro-Abortion, weak on Crime, Military and Illegal Immigration, Bad for Gun Owners and Veterans and against the WALL. Jones is a Pelosi/Schumer Puppet. Roy Moore will always vote with us. VOTE ROY MOORE! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2017

The RNC eventually resumed its financial support, and  President Trump recorded a robocall for Moore in the last days before the election. It was a tight race, but Jones won after historic turnout of the Democratic base -- specifically African-Americans and young voters .

17. "Fake news"

Shortly after the election last year, it became clear that false stories from  bogus "news" sites  had run  rampant on social media . But in 2017, the term "fake news" has taken on a new meaning that seems to apply to any story someone may not like. The president often refers to the mainstream media, specifically CNN, as "fake" when unflattering stories are published.

So much Fake News being put in dying magazines and newspapers. Only place worse may be @NBCNews , @CBSNews , @ABC and @CNN . Fiction writers! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 17, 2017

Just one month after he took office, Trump called the news media the "enemy of the American people." And a poll out in December found that 44 percent of Americans believe news outlets make up stories about the president and his administration "more than once in a while."

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Cydney Adams is a senior manager of social media for CBS News. She is also a digital producer focusing on culture and social issues.

2017 Yeni lez porno

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2017 Calendar

No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
1 234567
2891011121314
315 171819 21
422232425262728
5293031 
 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
5 1234
6567891011
712131415161718
819 2122232425
9262728 
 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
9 1234
10567891011
1112131415161718
1219202122232425
13262728293031 
 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
13 1
142345678
159101112131415
1616171819202122
1723242526272829
1830 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
18 123456
1978910111213
2014151617181920
2121222324252627
2228 3031 
 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
22 123
2345678910
2411121314151617
2518192021222324
26252627282930 
 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
26 1
2723 5678
289101112131415
2916171819202122
3023242526272829
313031 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
31 12345
326789101112
3313141516171819
3420212223242526
352728293031 
 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
35 12
363 56789
3710111213141516
3817181920212223
3924252627282930
 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
401234567
418 1011121314
4215161718192021
4322232425262728
44293031 
 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
44 1234
455678910
4612131415161718
4719202122 2425
482627282930 
 
No.SuMoTuWeThFrSa
48 12
493456789
5010111213141516
5117181920212223
5224 2627282930
131 

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  • 2017 in the United States


in

  • History of the United States (2008–present)
  • Timeline of United States history (2010–present)
  • List of years in the United States

Events in the year 2017 in the United States .

Incumbents [ edit ]

Federal government [ edit ].

  • President : Barack Obama ( D - Illinois ) (until January 20), Donald Trump ( R - New York ) (starting January 20)
  • Vice President : Joe Biden (D- Delaware ) (until January 20), Mike Pence (R- Indiana ) (starting January 20)
  • Chief Justice : John Roberts (New York)
  • Speaker of the House of Representatives : Paul Ryan (R- Wisconsin )
  • Senate Majority Leader : Mitch McConnell (R- Kentucky )
  • Congress : 114th (until January 3), 115th (starting January 3)
and
[ ] : ( ) (until April 10), ( ) (starting April 10) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 17), ( ) (starting January 17) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 9), ( ) (starting January 9) : ( ) (until May 24), ( ) (starting May 24) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 9), ( ) (starting January 9) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) ( ) ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 1), ( ) (starting January 1) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 24), ( ) (starting January 24) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 7), ( ) (starting January 7) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 16), ( / ) (starting January 16) : ( ) : ( ) [ ] : ( ) (until April 10), vacant (starting April 10) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : vacant (until January 17), ( ) (starting January 17) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 9), ( ) (starting January 9) : ( ) : ( ) (until May 24), vacant (starting May 24) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 9), ( ) (starting January 9) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 24) ( ) (starting January 25) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 7), ( ) (starting January 7) : ( ) : ( ) (until January 10), ( ) (starting January 10) : ( )

Events [ edit ]

January [ edit ].

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  • January 1 – Nevada 's ballot initiative legalizing recreational marijuana officially goes into effect. [1]
  • Four African-American individuals kidnap a mentally disabled white man in Chicago, Illinois and livestream their torture of him on Facebook, shouting "F*** Trump" and "F*** white people" while doing so, prompting widespread reactions on social media. The four suspects are later arrested and charged with a hate crime . [2]
  • The 115th United States Congress begins its first session.
  • A Long Island Railroad passenger train collides with buffer stops at Atlantic Terminal in New York City, injuring 103 people. [3] [4]
  • NASA selects Lucy and Psyche as the 13th and 14th missions of the Discovery Program , the result of a two-year long competition . [5]
  • After briefing President Barack Obama , the United States Senate , and President-elect Donald Trump , the United States Intelligence Community releases a declassified version of its investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election . The report asserts that Russia carried out a massive cyber operation on orders from President Vladimir Putin to influence the election in favor of Trump in a multipronged attack consisting of hacking the Democratic National Committee , use of social media and Internet trolls to spread misinformation , and open propaganda on Russian state media outlets. Trump asserts that the outcome of the election was not affected by the interference, but nonetheless announces his intention to appoint a team to combat international cyber attacks within his first 90 days in office. [6] [7] [8]
  • A gunman opens fire at the Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood International Airport in Broward County , Florida, killing five people and injuring an additional six, with another 36 people sustaining injuries in the ensuing panic on the tarmac . The suspect was placed in custody after surrendering to police. [9]
  • The 115th United States Congress confirms the Electoral College victory of Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election . [10]
  • The 74th Golden Globe Awards are held at The Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills , California. La La Land breaks the record for most awards given to a single film with seven wins out of seven nominations, including the award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy . Moonlight wins the award for Best Motion Picture – Drama . The Crown wins the award for Best Drama Series and Atlanta wins Best Comedy Series . Particular attention is brought to actress Meryl Streep 's acceptance speech for the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award , in which she criticizes President-elect Donald Trump for what she perceived as his indecency and demonizing of the press and immigrants during his campaign . Trump responded on Twitter, calling Streep "overrated" and denying her allegations that he mocked a disabled reporter. [11] [12]
  • SeaWorld San Diego hosts its final orca performance after years of criticism of their keeping killer whales in captivity . [13]
  • Mike Pence 's term as Governor of Indiana ends, 11 days before he becomes Vice President of The United States.
  • Eric Holcomb is inaugurated as the 51st governor of Indiana at the State House in Indianapolis .
  • Dylann Roof , convicted perpetrator of the 2015 Charleston church shooting , is sentenced to death . He is the first person in the US to face execution for federal hate crime charges. [14]
  • President Barack Obama delivers his farewell speech at McCormick Place in his hometown of Chicago. [15]
  • The Playboy Mansion is put up for sale however the terms of the sale state that the company's founder Hugh Hefner must live there until he dies.
  • Justice Department Inspector General Michael E. Horowitz launches an investigation into the conduct of the Justice Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation , specifically the decision of FBI Director James Comey to reopen the investigation into Hillary Clinton 's use of a private email server less than two weeks before the 2016 presidential election . [19]
  • As an act of reassurance to NATO allies, the Obama administration deploys over 3,000 American troops to Poland to ensure protection from any possible future aggression from Russia, who subsequently call the act a threat to their national security. [20]
  • Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey orders ExxonMobil to hand over documents related to a state investigation into whether the company misled the public about the impact of fossil fuels on global climate . [21]
  • January 13 – The Justice Department concludes its 13-month investigation into the Chicago Police Department and finds that the department regularly violated citizens' civil rights through the use of excessive force , particularly toward African-American and Latino individuals. [22]
  • January 14 – SpaceX launches its first Falcon 9 rocket since a vehicle exploded in September 2016, launching from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. [23]
  • January 17 – Three days before leaving office, President Obama commutes Chelsea Manning 's sentence for leaking documents to WikiLeaks . [24]
  • Mexican drug kingpin El Chapo is extradited to the United States to await trial. [25]
  • President Obama commutes the sentences of 330 prisoners, most of them nonviolent drug offenders. It is the highest number of commutations ever given in a single day by a US president. [26]
  • January 20 – Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th President of the United States , [27] and Mike Pence is sworn in as Vice President of the United States .
  • January 21 – 2.9 million people attend the Women's March in opposition to the inauguration of Donald Trump, making it the single biggest protest in U.S. history. [28]
  • President Donald Trump signs an executive order withdrawing the US from the controversial trade pact, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). [29]
  • President Trump issues an executive order freezing hiring to the federal government, excluding the military. [30]
  • President Trump signs a series of presidential memorandums allowing the federal government to move forward with the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline and Keystone XL pipeline. [31]
  • The Trump administration freezes all new research grants and contracts for the Environmental Protection Agency and temporarily bars its employees from posting press releases or updates to the agency's social media accounts and from speaking to the press. [32] [33]
  • The nominees for the 89th Academy Awards are announced. The nominees for Best Picture are Arrival , Fences , Hacksaw Ridge , Hell or High Water , Hidden Figures , La La Land , Lion , Manchester by the Sea , and Moonlight . La La Land ties with Titanic (1997) and All About Eve (1950) for the most Oscar nominations for a single film, with fourteen nominations. [34]
  • President Trump signs a set of executive orders directing the US Department of Homeland Security to use existing funds to begin construction on a wall on the U.S.–Mexico border and putting an end to the longstanding catch and release policy in an effort toward swifter deportations of illegal immigrants . [35]
  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average reaches 20,000 points for the first time ever. [36]
  • January 26 – A 2007 interview is released in which Carolyn Bryant, for whom African-American teenager Emmett Till was accused of making verbal and physical advances on, leading to his lynching death in 1955, admits that she fabricated that aspect of her testimony against Till. [37]
  • January 27 – President Trump signs an executive order banning the entry of refugees of the Syrian Civil War into the United States indefinitely, and banning the entry of all nationals, regardless of visa status, of Iran , Iraq , Syria , Libya , Somalia , Sudan , and Yemen to the US for 90 days. The order prompts international criticism, a lawsuit from the American Civil Liberties Union , the detainment of legal Muslim travelers at several international airports, and Iran announcing a ban on entry of US citizens into the country until the ban is lifted. [38] [39] [40] [41]
  • January 30 – President Trump fires acting United States Attorney General Sally Yates after she instructs the Justice Department to not carry out Trump's recent executive order on refugees and immigrants. [42]
  • January 31 – President Trump nominates federal appellate judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the vacant seat on the Supreme Court left by the death of Antonin Scalia in 2016. [43]

February [ edit ]

  • February 1 – The Department of Homeland Security Inspector General office opens an investigation into the implementation of Executive Order 13769 . [44]
  • The Trump administration enacts new sanctions against 25 entities in Iran in retaliation for their recent ballistic missile test. [45]
  • President Donald Trump signs an executive order to review and eventually scale back the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act put in place after the Great Recession . [46]
  • Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson secures a nationwide temporary restraining order on President Trump's immigration ban from judge James Robart , calling it unlawful and unconstitutional. [47]
  • February 5 – In Super Bowl LI , the New England Patriots defeat the Atlanta Falcons 34–28 in the first overtime game in the game's history. [48]
  • Betsy DeVos is confirmed as the new US Secretary of Education by the United States Senate in a 51–50 vote, with Vice President Mike Pence casting the tiebreaker vote. It is the first time in Senate history that a vice president has done so for a Cabinet nominee confirmation. [49] [50]
  • A tornado impacts New Orleans , Louisiana, leaving approximately 10,000 homes without electricity. [51]
  • Nearly 200,000 people are evacuated around Oroville , California, and surrounding areas due to an emergency spillway failure at Oroville Dam .
  • The annual 59th Grammy Awards are held in the Staples Center in Los Angeles, California .
  • February 14 – It is reported that President Trump's election campaign aides and other associates had repeated contacts with Russian intelligence officials in the year before the election. [52]
  • February 17 – President Donald Trump visits the Boeing South Carolina facility to see the first 787–10 Dreamliner built. [53]
  • NASA announces that TRAPPIST-1 , a star system 39 light years away, has been found to contain seven Earth-sized planets. At least three are in the habitable zone, but all seven have the potential to support liquid water. [54]
  • An Indian engineer is shot dead and another injured in Olathe, Kansas , in an apparent hate crime .
  • February 23 – Police forcibly evict all remaining Dakota Access Pipeline protesters , arresting thirty-three people. [55]
  • February 25 – Democrat Stephanie Hansen wins a special election , ensuring her party retains its 44-year control of the Delaware Senate . Democrats across the country, motivated by antipathy to Trump's presidency, raised over a million dollars for her campaign, a record amount for an election to the Delaware legislature and any special election in the state. Former Vice President Joseph Biden also went door-to-door with her. [56]
  • Kurt Busch wins the Daytona 500 in the first race for NASCAR 's newest race format.
  • The 89th Academy Awards , hosted by Jimmy Kimmel , are held at Dolby Theatre in Hollywood , with Barry Jenkins ' Moonlight winning Best Picture . Additionally, Damien Chazelle wins Best Director and Emma Stone wins Best Actress for La La Land , and Casey Affleck wins Best Actor for Manchester by the Sea . La La Land wins six awards out of a record-tying 14 nominations. The telecast garners 33 million viewers. [57]
  • In an embarrassing gaffe, La La Land is thought to be the winner of the Oscar for Best Picture , before the envelope is shown to reveal Moonlight as the actual winner.

March [ edit ]

  • March 2 – President Trump visits the aircraft carrier, the USS Gerald R. Ford . [58]
  • The U.S. Federal Reserve raises interest rates from 0.75 to 1.0%. [59]
  • President Trump's revised travel ban on Muslims and refugees is blocked by federal judges Derrick Watson in Hawaii and Theodore D. Chuang in Maryland. [60]
  • March 16 – Sebastian Gorka , a top advisor to President Trump, faces calls to resign after he is revealed to be a member of a Hungarian Nazi group. [61] [62]
  • March 18 – Rock and roll pioneer Chuck Berry dies at the age of 90. [63]
  • The United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence holds a hearing about Russian interference in the 2016 election and confirms that there is an ongoing investigation into ties between Trump's team and Russia. [64]
  • The Senate Judiciary Committee begins hearings on the nomination of Judge Neil M. Gorsuch to the Supreme Court of the United States . [65]
  • March 27 – President Trump calls to investigate any ties with Hillary Clinton and Russia. [66]
  • March 28 – President Trump signs the Energy Independence Executive Order, intended to boost coal and other fossil fuel production by rolling back Obama-era policies on climate change and the environment. [67]
  • Michael Flynn offers to testify before Congress in exchange for immunity from prosecution in relation to alleged Russian influence on the 2016 Presidential election. [68]
  • SpaceX conducts the world's first reflight of an orbital class rocket. [69] [70]

April [ edit ]

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  • April 5 – President Trump removes his senior strategist Steve Bannon from the National Security Council . [71]
  • April 6 – In response to a suspected chemical weapons attack on a rebel-held town, the U.S. military launches 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles at an air base in Syria . Russia describes the strikes as an "aggression", adding they significantly damage US-Russia ties. [72]
  • April 7 – Andi Mack debuts on Disney Channel . [73]
  • April 9 – David Dao, an Asian physician, is physically assaulted and dragged off a United Airlines flight from Chicago to Louisville by police, prompting worldwide reaction. [74]
  • April 13 – a large non-nuclear bomb known as the GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast (MOAB), is dropped by the United States in the Nangahar's Achin District in eastern Afghanistan to destroy tunnel complexes used by ISIL . [75] It is the first time the weapon is used in a combat role.
  • April 14 – Angelo Colon-Ortiz, 31, a suspect in the death of jogger Vanessa Marcotte, who disappeared on August 7, 2016, in Massachusetts and was later found dead, is arrested. [76]
  • Hundreds of President Trump's supporters clash with anti-Trump protesters in Berkeley, California. 21 people are arrested. [77]
  • Protests erupt in cities across the country, most notably at Mar-a-Lago with hundreds of thousands of demonstrators demanding President Trump release his tax returns. [78]
  • Federal judge Kristine Baker in Arkansas issues an injunction halting the execution by lethal injection of nine inmates, calling this method unconstitutional. [79]
  • Vice President Pence visits South Korea and calls North Korea's missile launch a 'provocation'.
  • Shooting of Robert Godwin : 74-year-old Godwin, a retired foundry worker is shot and killed while walking on a sidewalk in the Glenville neighborhood of Cleveland , Ohio by 37-year-old Steve Stephens, who posted a video of the shooting on his Facebook account.
  • Vice President Pence visits Camp Bonifas near the Korean Demilitarized Zone , unexpectedly deviating from his security plan and walking all the way to the military demarcation line, sending nearby security personnel scrambling.
  • President Trump, Melania and their son Barron kick off the 139th Annual Easter Egg Roll at the White House.
  • A State Department official warns of a "significant international response" if North Korea were to mount another nuclear test. [80]
  • A U.S. Army Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk from Fort Belvoir , Virginia with three crew members aboard crashes near Leonardtown, Maryland . One of the crew members was taken by helicopter to a local hospital. [81]
  • Georgia's 6th congressional district special election, 2017 ; a special election to replace Tom Price is scheduled to take place, With no candidate managing to get over 50% of the vote, leading to a run-off election scheduled for June 20 (although Democrat Jon Ossoff won a plurality of the votes) [82]
  • Disappearance of Etan Patz ; Pedro Hernandez is sentenced to 25 years to life in prison for the murder of Etan Patz. [83]
  • 39-year-old Kori Ali Muhammad kills three people in shootings in downtown Fresno [84]
  • Shooting of Robert Godwin : Murder suspect Steve Stephens is found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound after a brief police pursuit in Erie County , Pennsylvania. [85]
  • Vice President Pence gives a speech to troops stationed at the Yokosuka Naval Base aboard the USS Ronald Reagan
  • Aaron Hernandez commits suicide by hanging himself in prison. [86]
  • Jason Chaffetz announces he will not run for re-election to his House seat in 2018. [87]
  • Television host and author Bill O'Reilly is fired from Fox News following accusations of sexual assault. [88] [89] [90]
  • 15-year-old Elizabeth Thomas from Middle Tennessee is found safe in Northern California and 50-year-old kidnapper Tad Cummins is arrested after a four-week manhunt. [91]
  • President Trump hosts Sarah Palin , Kid Rock and Ted Nugent at the White House. [92]
  • President Trump holds a joint news conference with Italian PM Paolo Gentiloni .
  • April 21 – Surgeon General Vivek Murthy is removed from his post by the Trump administration and replaced by Sylvia Trent-Adams .
  • April 22 – March for Science .
  • Kim Sang-duk , a Korean American professor is detained in North Korea . [93]
  • Former President Barack Obama arrives in Chicago for a two-day visit and meets privately with at-risk young men on the South Side . [94]
  • Workers in New Orleans began to remove four monuments dedicated to the Confederacy era in New Orleans . [95]
  • The entire Senate is invited to the White House for a briefing on North Korea .

May [ edit ]

  • May 5 – Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 , directed by James Gunn , is released by Marvel Studios as the 15th film of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) and the sequel to 2014's Guardians of the Galaxy .
  • A tunnel collapse occurs at the Hanford Site in Washington State. [96] [97]
  • FBI chief James Comey is fired by Trump for mishandling of the Hillary Clinton email controversy . However, critics accuse Trump of attempting to subvert the ongoing FBI investigation into possible ties between Russia and the Trump campaign. [98]
  • May 12 – 43-year-old Thomas Hartless kills three people, including a police chief, in a shooting attack at Kirkersville, Ohio . [99]
  • President Trump is accused of asking FBI chief James Comey to drop an inquiry into links between Michael Flynn and Russia . [100]
  • President Trump is reported to have shared highly classified information with Russia , provided by Israeli intelligence, but stands by his "absolute right" to share it. [101]
  • Turkey's Police Counter Attack Team attack a crowd of protesters at the Turkish Ambassador's Residence in Washington, D.C. [102]
  • Chelsea Manning is freed after serving seven years of her 35-year sentence for leaking diplomatic cables and military files to WikiLeaks. [103]
  • Rep. Al Green (D-Texas) calls for President Trump to be impeached on the House floor. [104]
  • The U.S. Justice Department names former FBI chief Robert Mueller as special counsel to investigate alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election and possible collusion between President Trump's campaign and Moscow. [105]
  • An 18-year-old woman is killed and 22 other people injured after a car plows into pedestrians at Times Square in New York. The driver, a 26-year-old former U.S. Navy member, is arrested. [106]
  • A 1982 painting, Untitled , by the late Jean-Michel Basquiat , sells for $110 million at Sotheby's , becoming the most expensive work by an American artist ever sold at an auction. [107]
  • May 20 – Trump makes his first foreign visit as president, to Saudi Arabia , where he signs deals worth more than $350 billion. This includes a $110 billion arms deal – the single biggest in U.S. history. [108]
  • May 21 – The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus stages the final show in its 146-year history at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, New York. [109]
  • May 26 – An anti-Muslim stabbing attack aboard a Portland, Oregon commuter train kills two people and injures a third.
  • President Trump attends the G7 summit , where the six other leaders reaffirm their commitment to the Paris climate accord , but Trump says he will delay a decision on the agreement until the following week. [110]
  • Pandora – The World of Avatar opens at Animal Kingdom at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida.
  • May 28 – Takuma Sato wins the 101st Indianapolis 500 , becoming the first Japanese driver to win the event. [111]

June [ edit ]

  • June 1 – President Trump announces his intentions to withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement . [112]
  • June 2 – Wonder Woman , directed by Patty Jenkins , is released as the fourth film in the DC Extended Universe .
  • June 3 – Intelligence specialist Reality Winner is arrested in Texas on suspicion of leaking classified information to journalists. [113]
  • June 7 – The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) issues its first ever statewide travel advisory after Missouri passes SB-43. [114]
  • June 8 – Former FBI director James Comey testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee about conversations he had with President Trump and whether he pressured him to drop an investigation into former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn . [115]
  • The 71st annual Tony Awards are held at Radio City Music Hall. Dear Evan Hansen wins six awards including Best Musical and Best Leading Actor for Ben Platt.
  • The Pittsburgh Penguins defeat the Nashville Predators in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Finals to win the series 4–2 and win their 5th Stanley Cup title in their 50th season, winning the NHL Championship for the second year in a row. Penguins captain Sidney Crosby won the Conn Smythe Trophy as the NHL Playoffs MVP for the second consecutive year.
  • President Trump convenes his first full cabinet meeting in the White House. [116]
  • The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upholds a decision blocking President Trump's revised travel ban on people from six mainly Muslim nations. [117]
  • The Golden State Warriors defeat the Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 5 of the NBA Finals to win the series 4–1 and win their 5th NBA championship and their second in three years, winning the title with the best postseason record in history going 16–1. Warriors forward Kevin Durant won his first NBA title and won the NBA Finals MVP award .
  • House of Representatives Majority Whip Steve Scalise and his aides are hit by gunfire during a baseball practice in Virginia. The shooter is killed by a security detail. [118]
  • The Federal Reserve raises its key interest rate by 0.25%, to a target range of 1 to 1.25%, the second increase of the year and its highest level since 2008. [119]
  • Conor McGregor and Floyd Mayweather Jr. announce on Twitter that they will fight on August 26 after heavy anticipation at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, with the event being dubbed as The Money Fight .
  • It is reported that special counsel Robert Mueller is investigating President Trump for possible obstruction of justice and whether he tried to end an inquiry into his sacked national security adviser. [120]
  • A shooting at a UPS facility in San Francisco's Potrero Hill neighborhood leaves four dead, including the shooter, and six injured.
  • Michelle Carter of Massachusetts is found guilty of involuntary manslaughter for encouraging her boyfriend Conrad Roy to take his own life . She had sent a number of text messages encouraging him to kill himself and as a result Roy died of carbon monoxide poisoning inside his vehicle in 2014. [121]
  • Jeronimo Yanez is acquitted of all charges and is found to be not guilty in the case of the shooting of Philando Castile . He is later fired by the city of St. Anthony, Minnesota .
  • Pixar Animation Studios ' 18th feature film, Cars 3 , the sequel to 2011's Cars 2 , is released in theaters.
  • June 19 – Otto Warmbier , an American student detained in North Korea , dies after suffering from what is believed to be a cardiopulmonary event.
  • June 20 – A severe heatwave causes more than 40 American Airlines planes to be grounded. [122] [123]

July [ edit ]

  • July 7 – Spider-Man: Homecoming , the second reboot of the Spider-Man film franchise directed by Jon Watts , is released by Marvel Studios and Columbia Pictures as the 16th film of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU).
  • July 9 – It is reported that President Trump's eldest son, Donald Trump Jr. , met with a Russian lawyer after being promised damaging information on Hillary Clinton during the 2016 election. [124]
  • July 11 – Donald Trump Jr. releases email transcripts, via Twitter, showing he was offered "sensitive" information about Hillary Clinton from a Russian contact, and replied "I love it". [125] [126]
  • Police officer Mohamed Noor murders Australian woman Justine Damond near her home in Minneapolis , Minnesota after she called 9–1–1 to report a nearby assault. The police officers did not have their body cameras turned on and the reason for the shooting is unclear, prompting protests in the city. [127]
  • Flash floods occur at a popular swimming hole near Payson , Arizona , killing 10 people and injuring 4 more.
  • July 18 – A Senate GOP bill to repeal and replace large portions of Obamacare fails to win enough support to pass. [128]
  • July 20 – Former US football star and actor O. J. Simpson is granted parole after nine years in a Nevada prison. [129]
  • White House press secretary Sean Spicer resigns in protest at the appointment of communications director Anthony Scaramucci . [130]
  • Raven's Home debuts on Disney Channel . [131]
  • July 22 – In a tweet , President Trump asserts his "complete power to pardon ." This follows reports that he had been discussing his ability to pardon people under investigation for possible ties between his campaign and Russia meddling with the 2016 election . [132] [133]
  • July 24 – President Trump sparks controversy after giving a highly politicized speech to approximately 35,000 Boy Scouts at the 2017 National Scout Jamboree . [134] [135]
  • The US Senate votes to start debating a new Republican healthcare bill to replace Obamacare. [136]
  • The US House of Representatives votes to impose fresh sanctions on Russia, despite President Trump objecting to the legislation. [137]
  • The President tweets that transgender people cannot serve in "any capacity" in the US military. [138]
  • The first gene editing of human embryos in the USA is reported to have taken place, using CRISPR . [139] [140]
  • The United States men's national soccer team defeats Jamaica 2–1 in the final to win the 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup title, their 6th overall.
  • The FBI raids the home of Paul Manafort , a former chairman of the Trump campaign, regarding potential collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign. [141]
  • Jeff Bezos briefly becomes the world's richest person, surpassing Bill Gates with a net worth of just over $90 billion. He loses the title later in the day when Amazon's stock drops, returning him to second place with a net worth just below $90 billion. [142]
  • In a 235–192 vote, the House passes a $788 billion spending bill that combines a $1.6 billion down payment for President Donald Trump's controversial border wall with Mexico and a large budget increase for the Pentagon. [143]
  • A third attempt to repeal Obamacare fails after it is voted down by 51 votes to 49. Three Republicans – John McCain , Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski – vote against the bill. [144]
  • Reince Priebus is removed as White House Chief of Staff , with President Trump naming General John Kelly as his replacement. [145]
  • President Trump removes Anthony Scaramucci as White House communications director, just ten days after his appointment. [146]
  • It is reported that President Trump personally dictated his son Donald Trump Jr.'s statement on his talks with a Russian lawyer during the election campaign. [147]

August [ edit ]

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  • August 1 – A top EPA official, Elizabeth "Betsy" Southerland, resigns in protest at the direction of the agency under the Trump administration. [148] [149]
  • Grandmaster Flash member Kidd Creole is arrested in New York on murder charges after a homeless man is found with multiple stab wounds to his torso. [150]
  • White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders confirms in her daily briefing that two supposed phone calls to President Trump never actually took place – the first from the Boy Scouts , who Trump claimed had praised him for the best speech ever delivered in the organization's 100-year history; the second from Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto , who Trump claimed had complimented his border control efforts. [151]
  • Transcripts from a phone call released by The Washington Post show that President Trump had urged Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto to stop saying he would refuse to pay for the proposed border wall . Another transcript is released of a heated argument between Trump and the Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull . [152] [153]
  • The special counsel investigating claims of Russian meddling in the US election begins using a grand jury in Washington. [154]
  • Martin Shkreli is found guilty in federal court on three counts of fraud related to two hedge funds he ran, MSMB Capital and MSMB Healthcare. [155]
  • In a letter to Darwin Life, Inc. and New Hope Fertility Center, the FDA warns that the " three parent baby " technique should not be marketed in the U.S. [156]
  • August 5 – A tornado takes place near Tulsa , Oklahoma . [157] [158] [159] [160]
  • August 6 – Sharknado 5: Global Swarming airs for the first time on Syfy . [161]
  • After reports that North Korea has produced a nuclear warhead small enough to fit inside its missiles, President Trump warns that the country "will be met with fire and fury" if it threatens the US. [162]
  • North Korea states that it is considering a missile strike against the Andersen Air Force Base in Guam . [163]
  • August 9 – North Korea releases a statement that the Korean People's Army Strategic Force is considering firing multiple Hwasong-12 IRBMs near Guam as a warning shot against the United States. [164] [165]
  • August 12 – The Unite the Right rally , a gathering of alt-right , white nationalist , neo-Nazi , and neo-Confederate groups protesting the removal of the Robert Edward Lee Sculpture and other Confederate monuments and memorials from public spaces, is held in Charlottesville, Virginia . [166] Violent clashes break out between attendees and counter-protesters; 32-year-old Heather Heyer is killed and many others are injured when a car ploughs into a group of people; and two Virginia State Police troopers are killed when their surveillance helicopter crashes, prompting Governor Terry McAuliffe to declare a state of emergency. [167]
  • August 14 – After several days of public pressure, President Donald Trump explicitly condemns the white supremacist groups involved in violent clashes at Charlottesville. [168]
  • President Trump is criticized by leaders in the Republican and Democrat parties for backpedaling on explicitly condemning the white supremacist groups involved in the Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally. [169]
  • Following a week of escalating tensions between North Korea and the United States, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un opts to wait on attacking Guam. [170]
  • President Trump disbands two of his business councils after multiple members resign in response to the President's handling of the Charlottesville incident. [171] [172]
  • Former president Barack Obama's Twitter response to the Charlottesville rally, in which he posted a quote from Nelson Mandela , receives over 4 million 'likes' and becomes the most 'liked' tweet ever. [173]
  • Regarding the earlier violence in Charlottesville, former presidents George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush call upon incumbent President Trump to "reject racial bigotry, anti-Semitism and hatred in all forms." [174]
  • Steve Bannon is fired from his positions as the White House Chief Strategist and Senior Counselor to the President . [175] In a statement later, he says "The Trump presidency we fought for and won is over. We still have this huge movement, and there'll be good days and bad days, but that presidency is over." [176]
  • A mass resignation of the President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities is made in protest against Trump's response to the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia . [177] [178] [179]
  • A search team financed by Paul Allen locates the wreck of the USS Indianapolis in the Philippine Sea , 72 years after it was sunk by a Japanese submarine. [180]
  • August 19 – Up to 30,000 people gather on Boston Common to protest a right-wing rally, motivated in part as a response to the recent Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville. [181]
  • August 20 – An oil tanker collides with the USS John S. McCain near Singapore, injuring five US Navy sailors and leaving ten missing. [182]
  • August 21 – A total solar eclipse takes place. It is the first total solar eclipse of the 21st century for the United States, the first visible from the continental U.S. since February 26, 1979 , and the first to span the entire continental U.S. since June 8, 1918 . Totality occurs along a path curving from Oregon to South Carolina , and lasts at most for 2 minutes and 40.2 seconds. The location and time of "greatest eclipse" is on the western edge of Christian County , Kentucky, at 36.9715 degrees north and 87.6559 degrees west, occurring at 18:25 UTC. [183]
  • August 22 – At a "Make America Great Again" rally in Phoenix, Arizona , President Trump says he will close down the US government if necessary to build his wall along the Mexico border. [184]
  • August 23 – The science envoy for the State Department, Daniel Kammen , resigns following President Trump's response to the rally in Charlottesville. In his resignation letter addressed to Trump, the first letter of every paragraph spells out "impeach". [185]
  • A woman from Chicopee, Massachusetts wins $758.7m—the largest jackpot in North American history—in the Powerball lottery . [186]
  • For the first time, a drug-cocktail of etomidate , rocuronium bromide , and potassium acetate is used by the United States for lethal injection . The experimental injection is used to execute Mark Asay in Florida after concerns that a more conventional drug, midazolam , was causing prisoners to suffer agonizing deaths. [187]
  • Hurricane Harvey forms in the Gulf of Mexico. [188]
  • Hurricane Harvey , a category 4 tropical cyclone , makes landfall in Texas. The hurricane is predicted to be the worst to strike Texas in 12 years. [189]
  • A directive is signed by President Donald Trump that bans transgender military recruits. [190]
  • President Trump pardons former Maricopa County sheriff Joe Arpaio , who had previously been convicted of defying a court order to cease traffic patrols using racial profiling . [191]
  • Sebastian Gorka , a military and intelligence analyst, resigns from his position as a White House counter-terrorism adviser. [192]
  • American Floyd Mayweather Jr. defeats Irishman Conor McGregor in the 10th round at " The Money Fight " boxing match in Las Vegas , extending his undefeated professional boxing streak to 50 victories and 0 defeats (50–0), surpassing the 49–0 record of Rocky Marciano . [193]
  • New Tappan Zee Bridge over the Hudson River opens.
  • Katy Perry hosts the 2017 MTV Video Music Awards at The Forum in Inglewood, California . [194] American rapper Kendrick Lamar is the night's biggest winner, walking away with six awards. [195]
  • Right-wing protesters and thousands of far-left counter-protesters clash in Berkeley, California . 11 people are injured and 21 are arrested. [196]
  • August 28 – President Trump signs an executive order allowing police to acquire and use military-style equipment. [197]
  • Following North Korea's firing of a ballistic missile over northern Japan, President Donald Trump warns that "all options are on the table" in terms of a response to North Korean aggression. [198]
  • Both the Addicks Dam and Barker Dam in Houston begin overflowing due to Hurricane Harvey, worsening flooding hazards. [199] A curfew is imposed in Houston to help prevent looting of evacuated homes. [200]
  • U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump arrive in Texas to survey the damage of Tropical Storm Harvey. [201]
  • U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia blocks Texas's enforcement of a sanctuary city law. [202]
  • The U.S. government orders the closure of Russian consulate facilities in San Francisco, D.C. , and New York City. [203]

September [ edit ]

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • September 3 – Media outlets publish the content of the letter Barack Obama left in the Resolute desk for President Donald Trump . [204]
  • September 4 – Governor Rick Scott declares a state of emergency for Florida as Hurricane Irma approaches from the Atlantic. [205]
  • September 5 – The Trump administration announces that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration policy, which was set by the Obama administration in 2012, will be scrapped. [206]
  • September 9 – Sloane Stephens defeats Madison Keys in two sets to win the US Open Women's Singles tennis championship, her first Grand Slam title. [207]
  • September 10 – Millions of homes are left without power as the center of Hurricane Irma hits mainland Florida, just south of Naples . [208]
  • Seattle mayor Ed Murray resigns after facing multiple accusations of child abuse, rape and sexual molestation, including some from family members and children under his care. He denies the accusations. [209]
  • Hillary Clinton 's memoir, What Happened , is published, describing her experience as the Democratic Party 's nominee for President of the United States in the 2016 election .
  • September 13 – The International Olympic Committee awards Los Angeles, California, the rights to host for the 2028 Summer Olympics . It was alongside in Paris, for the winning selected city for the 2024 Summer Olympics , respectively. [210]
  • September 18 – Toys "R" Us files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy , stating the move will give it flexibility to deal with $5 billion in long-term debt and invest in improving current operations. [211]
  • September 19 – President Trump makes his first appearance at the United Nations, during which he claims the US may 'have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea '. [212]
  • September 20 – Hurricane Maria makes landfall in the US territory of Puerto Rico with maximum sustained winds of 250 km/h (155 mph). [213] Millions of people are left without power. [214]
  • September 22 – During a political rally in Alabama , President Trump criticizes NFL football players kneeling during the national anthem in protest of police brutality against African-Americans, saying that team owners should "fire" them for doing it. The comments spark widespread condemnation and increases in protests from players during the national anthem. [215] [216]
  • September 27- Playboy founder Hugh Hefner dies at the age of 91.
  • September 29 – US Health Secretary Tom Price resigns over a scandal involving the use of expensive private planes for official business. [217]
  • September 30 – President Donald Trump receives widespread backlash for attacking Carmen Yulín Cruz , the mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico , on Twitter after she criticizes the United States federal government's response to the devastation from Hurricane Maria in the territory. [218]

October [ edit ]

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • Former US football star and actor O. J. Simpson is freed on parole after serving nine years of a 33-year sentence for armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, and 10 other charges. [219]
  • Stephen Paddock opens fire on a crowd at the Route 91 Harvest music festival adjacent to the Mandalay Bay resort and casino at the Las Vegas Strip. 59 people were killed and 869 were injured, making it the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. [220] [221]
  • The Department of Justice reverses an Obama-era policy which used Title VII of the Civil Rights Act to protect transgender employees from discrimination . [222]
  • An exposé is published in The New York Times accusing film producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment spanning three decades, involving a number of actresses and female production assistants, temps and other employees. [223] [224] Further allegations emerge in subsequent days, that Weinstein had assaulted or harassed 13 women, and raped three of them. [225]
  • The Trump administration issues a ruling that allows employers to opt out of providing free birth control to their employees. [226]
  • The Vegas Golden Knights play their first NHL game in franchise history with a 2–1 win over the Dallas Stars .
  • October 8 – October 2017 Northern California wildfires : The deadliest week of wildfires in California's history occurs, killing at least 35 people and leaving devastation across hundreds of thousands of acres. [227]
  • The USA soccer team team plays the last match against Trinidad and Tobago in qualifying for the 2018 FIFA World Cup to be played in Russia , the Americans had to win to qualify for the World Cup but lost 2 to 1 leaving them eliminated by first time in its history cutting a positive streak of 7 consecutive classifications to the world championships.
  • It is announced that the Boy Scouts will allow girls to join for the first time in the program's 117-year history beginning in the fall of 2018.
  • October 12 – The US announces its withdrawal from UNESCO , accusing it of "anti-Israel" bias. [229]
  • October 13 – In a speech at the White House, President Trump condemns Iran as a "fanatical regime", proposes new sanctions, and states that he will refuse to continue certifying the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action , a landmark nuclear deal. [230]
  • October 26 – Nearly 3,000 files related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy are released, while President Trump orders others to be withheld, citing national security concerns. The documents were scheduled for release in a 1992 law . [231]
  • October 27 – The first charges are filed in the investigation led by special counsel Robert Mueller into alleged Russia interference in the 2016 US election. [232]
  • October 30 – Actor Kevin Spacey issues an apology over an alleged sexual advance made towards a child actor 30 years previously. [233] It is announced that Netflix will end the popular TV show House of Cards , in which Spacey has played the leading role. [234] Further allegations arise in subsequent days. [235]
  • October 31 – A flatbed pickup truck is driven into pedestrians along West Street in Lower Manhattan , New York City, causing at least eight deaths and multiple injuries. [236]

November [ edit ]

  • Actor Dustin Hoffman is accused of sexually harassing a 17-year-old intern on the set of one of his films in 1985. [237]
  • The Houston Astros defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers after seven games to become the World Series champions. The Astros World Series title comes at a time of healing for the city of Houston which was struck by Hurricane Harvey three months ago.
  • President Trump confirms Jerome Powell as his nominee for chair of the US Federal Reserve . [238]
  • The New York City news websites DNAinfo and Gothamist are shut down by owner Joe Ricketts one week after the publications' employees voted to unionize. [239]
  • The latest National Climate Assessment , a 477-page report by 13 federal agencies, concludes that global warming is "extremely likely" (with 95 to 100% certainty) to be human-caused, mostly from the burning of fossil fuels. This contradicts statements from the Trump administration that carbon dioxide is not the primary contributor to global warming. [240]
  • Thor: Ragnarok , directed by Taika Waititi , is released by Marvel Studios as the 17th film of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) and the sequel to 2011's Thor and 2013's Thor: The Dark World .
  • November 4 – President Trump begins his first visit to Asia, a 13-day tour that will include Japan, South Korea , China, Vietnam , and the Philippines . [241]
  • 26-year-old Devin Kelley kills 26 people and injures 20 in a Baptist church in Sutherland Springs, Texas . It is the 5th deadliest shooting in United States history, and the deadliest in a place of worship.
  • Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross is revealed by the Paradise Papers to have business links with Russian allies of President Vladimir Putin who are under US sanctions. [242]
  • November 6 – Entrepreneur Andrew Yang announces his candidacy for U.S. president in 2020. [243]
  • November 7 – In Virginia, Danica Roem becomes the first openly transgender person to win an election to a state legislature and serve her term, beating Republican Bob Marshall . [244]
  • November 9 – The New York Times published allegations from five women who said they were sexually harassed by Louis C.K. between the late 1990s and 2000. [245]
  • November 12 – After North Korea denounces President Trump's Asia trip, calling it a "warmonger's visit" and describing the president as a "dotard", [246] Trump responds on Twitter: " Why would Kim Jong-un insult me by calling me "old," when I would NEVER call him "short and fat?" Oh well, I try so hard to be his friend – and maybe someday that will happen! " [247]
  • November 13 – The FDA approves "Abilify MyCite", the first drug in the U.S. with a digital ingestion tracking system that records when the medication was taken, via a sensor embedded in the pill. [248] [249] [250] [251]
  • November 14 – A gunman embarks on a shooting spree across Rancho Tehama, California , killing a total of four people and wounding twelve others before being shot and killed by police. He had earlier murdered his wife in their home. [252] [253] [254] [255] [256]
  • November 15 – The Trump administration announces that it will reverse a ban on elephant trophies from Africa, enacted by Barack Obama in 2014. [257]
  • The former President George HW Bush is accused by multiple women of groping them in the past. [258]
  • Justice League , directed by Zack Snyder – with post-production direction by Joss Whedon – is released as the fifth film in the DC Extended Universe . Following its release, fans began to push for the release of Snyder's original version of the film. This version, Zack Snyder's Justice League , would later be released in 2021.
  • November 19 – The notorious killer and cult leader Charles Manson dies aged 83, after 46 years in prison. [259]
  • November 19 – Martin Truex Jr. wins his first ever Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series championship at Homestead Miami Speedway . [260]
  • November 20 – It is alleged that Eric Trump funneled cancer charity money to his business. [261]
  • November 21 – CBS fires talk show host Charlie Rose after eight women accuse him of inappropriate behavior. [262]
  • November 22 – Pixar Animation Studios ' 19th feature film, Coco , is released in theaters.
  • November 27 – Matt Lauer , one of the most famous TV news anchors in the US, is fired from NBC following accusations of sexual assault. [263]
  • November 29 – President Trump's Twitter account retweets three inflammatory videos from far-right group, Britain First . [264]
  • November 30 – It is reported that, during the summer, President Trump tried to pressure a number of top Republicans to end the Senate investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election. [265]

December [ edit ]

  • December 1 – President Trump's ex-national security adviser Michael Flynn is charged with making a false statement to the FBI in January. [266]
  • The Senate passes the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 , the most sweeping overhaul of the US tax code since the Reagan era. [267] [268]
  • Emails, interviews and court documents involving senior Trump transition team officials, reported by The New York Times , suggest that Michael Flynn did not act alone, both before and after he spoke with Russian ambassador, Sergey Kislyak . [269]
  • President Trump announces an 85% cut to Utah 's 1.3m acre Bears Ears National Monument and a 50% cut to the 1.9m acre Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument , angering Native American tribes and environmental groups. [270]
  • The Supreme Court allows President Trump's travel ban on six mainly Muslim countries to go fully into effect. [271]
  • December 6 – In a speech at the White House, President Trump announces that the US now recognizes Jerusalem as Israel's capital. [272]
  • December 7 – A magnitude 4 earthquake happens in California.
  • December 8 – A state of emergency is declared in California as the worst wildfires on record devastate homes and businesses in the region, forcing the evacuation of 200,000 people. [273]
  • December 11 – A man is arrested after an explosion at New York's Port Authority Bus Terminal , described by Mayor Bill de Blasio as an "attempted terrorist attack". [274]
  • December 12 – Democrat Doug Jones defeats Republican candidate Roy Moore to win the Senate seat for Alabama , the first time a Democrat has won the state since 1992. [275]
  • December 13 – The Federal Reserve raises interest rates by a quarter percentage point, to a range of 1.25–1.5 percent, the third rise of 2017. [276]
  • Walt Disney announces that it will buy 21st Century Fox 's entertainment assets for $52.4bn, ending more than half a century of media expansion by Rupert Murdoch . [277]
  • Despite strong public opposition, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) votes to repeal net neutrality . [278]
  • The Washington Post reports that staff at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have been forbidden by the Trump administration from using the words "vulnerable," “entitlement," “diversity," “transgender," “fetus," “evidence-based" and "science-based" in any official documents being prepared for next year's budget. [279]
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi is released in theaters.
  • December 16 – The Pentagon confirms the existence of the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program (AATIP), a secret investigatory effort funded from 2007 to 2012 by the United States government to study unexplained aerial phenomena (and/or unidentified flying objects ). [280] [281]
  • President Trump announces that climate change will be dropped from a list of national security threats. [282]
  • 2017 Washington train derailment : An Amtrak train derails and crashes onto Interstate 5 near DuPont, Washington , leaving three dead. [283]
  • John Skipper resigns as president of ESPN to deal with his substance addiction. Former network president and executive chairman George Bodenheimer is announced as the acting chairman for the next 90 days until a replacement is found. [284]
  • December 19 – The FDA approves Luxturna , the first gene therapy for an inherited condition in the U.S., for patients with a form of retinal dystrophy. [285] [286]
  • December 20 – The Greatest Showman is released in theaters.
  • Papa John's founder John Schnatter steps down as CEO of the pizza restaurant chain and will be replaced by chief operating officer Steve Ritchie on January 1. [287]
  • The National Center for Health Statistics reports that US life expectancy fell in 2016 for the second year running, the first time in more than half a century that such a consecutive decline has occurred. The drop, from 78.7 to 78.6, was reportedly driven by the worsening opioid crisis . [288] [289]
  • December 22 – Everitt Aaron Jameson, a 25-year-old former marine, is arrested by the FBI on suspicion of planning a terror attack in the Pier 39 area of San Francisco over Christmas. [290]
  • December 31 – In American football , the Cleveland Browns finish their season with an 0–16 record, becoming the second team in history to do so after the 2008 Lions . [291] [292]

Deaths [ edit ]

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • Jewel Plummer Cobb , biologist, cancer researcher, and university president (b. 1924)
  • Jeremy Stone , scientist and activist (b. 1935)
  • Sylvester Uphus , farmer and politician (b. 1927)
  • Albert Brewer , politician; 47th Governor of Alabama (1968–1971) (b. 1928)
  • Richard Machowicz , U.S. Navy SEAL and television personality (b. 1965)
  • Daryl Spencer , baseball player (b. 1928)
  • Martin Brandtner , Marine Corps general (b. 1938)
  • Charles J. Colgan , businessman and politician (b. 1926)
  • J. Dewey Daane , economist (b. 1918)
  • George M. Dennison , university president (b. 1935)
  • Rosemary Stevenson , baseball player (b. 1936)
  • Willie Evans , football player (b. 1937)
  • Bruce Hugo , politician (b. 1945)
  • Carl E. Misch , prosthodontist (b. 1947)
  • Art Pennington , baseball player (b. 1923)
  • Paul Goble , English-born author and illustrator (b. 1933)
  • Stanley Russ , politician (b. 1930)
  • John Wightman , politician (b. 1938)
  • Audrey Grevious , civil rights activist (b. 1930)
  • Greg Jelks , baseball player (b. 1961)
  • Les Lazarowitz , sound mixer (b. 1941)
  • Sylvester Potts , American singer and composer (b. 1938)
  • Bob Sadowski , baseball player (b. 1937)
  • Tilikum , American-held orca (b. ca. 1981) [293]
  • Francine York , actress (b. 1930)
  • Bill Champion baseball player (b. 1947)
  • John Deely , philosopher and semiotician (b. 1942)
  • Nat Hentoff , music critic, journalist, historian, and activist (b. 1925 ) [294]
  • Eddie Kamae , musician and film producer (b. 1927)
  • Betty Lasky , film historian (b. 1922)
  • Mildred Meacham , baseball player (b. 1924)
  • Murray Ryan , politician (b. 1922)
  • Michael Scanlan , Roman Catholic priest and university administrator (b. 1931)
  • Buddy Bregman , composer, arranger, conductor, and producer (b. 1930)
  • Jackie Brown , baseball player (b. 1943)
  • James C. Christensen , fantasy artist (b. 1942)
  • Miriam Goldberg , newspaper publisher (b. 1916)
  • Mary Ann Green , tribal leader and politician (b. 1964)
  • Roy Innis , civil rights activist (b. 1934)
  • Pioneer Cabin Tree , iconic tree in California
  • Eli Zelkha , Iranian-born entrepreneur (b. 1950)
  • Rodney H. Brady , businessman and college president (b. 1933)
  • Charles Bragg , artist (b. 1931)
  • Crazy Toones , hip-hop record producer and DJ (b. 1971)
  • Patrick Flores , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1929)
  • John Sailhamer , Evangelical Old Testament scholar (b. 1946)
  • Warren Allen Smith , humanist and gay rights activist (b. 1921)
  • Timothy Well , professional wrestler (b. 1961)
  • Hiag Akmakjian , 91, author, painter and photographer (b. 1926)
  • Steve Fryar , 63, rodeo performer (b. 1953)
  • Buddy Greco , jazz and pop singer and pianist (b. 1926)
  • Steven McDonald , police detective (b. 1957)
  • Oliver Smithies , English-born geneticist and Nobel laureate (b. 1925)
  • Tommy Allsup , rockabilly guitarist (b. 1931)
  • Henry Foner , social activist (b. 1919)
  • Conrad Hilberry , poet (b. 1928)
  • Victor Lownes , publishing executive and film producer (b. 1928)
  • Akio Takamori , Japanese-born sculptor (b. 1950)
  • William Peter Blatty , novelist and screenwriter (b. 1928)
  • Milton Metz , radio and television personality (b. 1921)
  • Frank Spellman , weightlifter (b. 1922)
  • Hans Berliner , German-born computer scientist and chess player (b. 1929)
  • Dick Gautier , actor, comedian, singer, and caricaturist (b. 1931)
  • Alan Jabbour , musician and folklorist (b. 1942)
  • David Modell , businessman and NFL executive (b. 1960)
  • Nicodemo Scarfo , mob boss (b. 1929)
  • Alex Jones , Roman Catholic deacon (b. 1941)
  • Kevin Starr , historian (b. 1940)
  • George Beall , attorney (b. 1937)
  • Ciel Bergman , painter (b. 1938)
  • Vicki Lansky , author and publisher (b. 1942)
  • Eddie Long , Baptist pastor (b. 1953)
  • David Poythress , politician (b. 1943)
  • Dale Smith , rodeo performer (b. 1928)
  • Jimmy Snuka , Fijian-born professional wrestler (b. 1943)
  • Greg Trooper , singer-songwriter and musician (b. 1956)
  • Eugene Cernan , aviator and astronaut (b. 1934)
  • William A. Hilliard , journalist (b. 1927)
  • Dan O'Brien Sr. , baseball executive (b. 1929)
  • Phyllis Harrison-Ross , psychiatrist (b. 1936)
  • Charles "Bobo" Shaw , jazz drummer (b. 1947)
  • Steve Wright , rock bassist
  • Brenda C. Barnes , business executive (b. 1953)
  • Tirrel Burton , football player, coach, and broadcaster (b. 1929)
  • David P. Buckson , attorney and politician (b. 1920)
  • Colo , western gorilla (b. 1956)
  • Kenneth McNenny , rancher and politician (b. 1935)
  • Gene Olaff , soccer player (b. 1920)
  • Robert Timlin , federal judge (b. 1932)
  • Red Adams , baseball player, scout, and coach (b. 1921)
  • David P. Buckson , lawyer and politician, 63rd Governor of Delaware (b. 1920)
  • Yuji Ijiri , 81, Japanese-born accounting academic (b. 1935)
  • Lucy Killea , politician (b. 1922)
  • William Margold , pornographic film actor and director (b. 1943)
  • Lawrence S. Margolis , federal judge (b. 1935)
  • Harry Minor , baseball player, manager, and scout (b. 1928)
  • Roberta Peters , coloratura soprano (b. 1930)
  • Dick Starr , baseball player (b. 1921)
  • Wayne Barrett , journalist (b. 1945)
  • Miguel Ferrer , actor (b. 1955)
  • Craig Howard , football player and coach (b. 1952)
  • Edwin Pope , journalist (b. 1928)
  • Walt Streuli , baseball player (b. 1935)
  • James S. Vlasto , public servant (b. 1934)
  • Jack August , historian (b. 1954)
  • Bill Fischer , football player (b. 1927)
  • Michael Goldberg , sports executive (b. 1943)
  • Alec Devon Kreider , convicted murderer (b. 1991)
  • Charles Liteky , military chaplain and peace activist (b. 1931)
  • Harry J. Middleton , writer and library director (b. 1921)
  • Joey Powers , singer-songwriter (b. 1934)
  • Chuck Stewart , jazz photographer (b. 1927)
  • Tommy Tate , soul singer and songwriter (b. 1944)
  • Byron Dobell , editor and writer (b. 1927)
  • Karl Hendricks , singer, songwriter and guitarist (b. 1970)
  • José de Jesús Madera Uribe , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1927)
  • Walter Morrison , Hall of Fame musician and record producer (b. 1954)
  • William Albert Norris , judge (b. 1927)
  • Maggie Roche , singer-songwriter (b. 1951)
  • Ken Wright , baseball player (b. 1946)
  • January 22 – Evelyn Kawamoto , swimmer (b. 1933)
  • J. S. G. Boggs , artist (b. 1955)
  • Earl Foreman , lawyer and sports executive (b. 1924)
  • Bobby Freeman , singer and songwriter (b. 1940)
  • Ralph Guglielmi , football player (b. 1933)
  • Leon Katz , playwright (b. 1919)
  • Bernard Redmont , journalist (b. 1918)
  • Anatol Roshko , physicist and engineer (b. 1923)
  • Ruth Samuelson , politician (b. 1959)
  • Marvell Thomas , keyboardist (b. 1941)
  • Mary Webster , actress (b. 1935)
  • Chuck Canfield , businessman and politician (b. 1932)
  • Robert Folsom , politician (b. 1927)
  • Martin Nicholas Lohmuller , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1919)
  • Gil Ray , drummer (b. 1956)
  • Butch Trucks , drummer (b. 1947)
  • Chuck Weyant , racecar driver (b. 1923)
  • William Lacy Carter , politician (b. 1925)
  • Ann Dandrow , politician (b. 1936)
  • Robert Garcia , politician (b. 1933)
  • Kevin Geer , actor (b. 1952)
  • Harry Mathews , novelist and poet (b. 1930)
  • Jack Mendelsohn , cartoonist and screenwriter (b. 1926)
  • Mary Tyler Moore , actress (b. 1936) [295]
  • Mike Connors , actor (b. 1925)
  • Hal Geer , 100, producer and filmmaker (b. 1916)
  • Barbara Hale , 94, actress (b. 1922)
  • Leonard Linkow , dentist and pioneer in oral implantology (b. 1926)
  • Charles Recher , artist (b. 1950)
  • Stan Boreson , comedian and television host (b. 1925)
  • Bob Bowman , baseball player (b. 1930)
  • Bob Holiday , actor (b. 1932)
  • Robert Ellis Miller , film director (b. 1927)
  • Arthur H. Rosenfeld , physicist (b. 1926)
  • Charles Shackleford , basketball player (b. 1966)
  • Jack Thrasher , immunotoxicologist (b. 1938)
  • Gwen Gillen , sculptor and artist (b. 1941)
  • Guitar Gable , blues musician (b. 1937)
  • Charles LeMaistre , academic administrator (b. 1924)
  • John N. Mather , mathematician (b. 1942)
  • Bharati Mukherjee , Indian-born writer and academic (b. 1940)
  • Sterling Newberry , inventor (b. 1915)
  • Anthony J. Perpich , politician (b. 1932)
  • Richard Portman , sound mixer (b. 1934)
  • William Schwarzer , federal judge (b. 1925)
  • Dan Spiegle , comic book artist (b. 1920)
  • Stuart Timmons , gay historian and activist (b. 1957)
  • Howard Frank Mosher , author (b. 1942)
  • William Owens , Navy SEAL soldier (b. 1981)
  • Leonard H. Perroots , military officer (b. 1933)
  • Elliot Sperling , historian (b. 1951)
  • Dore Ashton , 89, writer and critic (b. 1928)
  • Marta Becket , 92, dancer (b. 1924)
  • Don Coleman , 88, football player (b. 1928)
  • Carmen Contreras-Bozak , World War II veteran and the first Hispanic member of the Women's Army Corps. (b. 1919)
  • Doris Lockness , aviation pioneer (b. 1910)
  • Harold Rosen , electrical engineer (b. 1926)
  • Thomas Barlow , politician (b. 1940)
  • Trice Harvey , politician (b. 1936)
  • Frank Pellegrino , actor and restaurateur (b. 1944)
  • David Shepard , film preservationist (b. 1940)
  • Bobby Watson , 86, basketball player (b. 1930)

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  • Anne Arrasmith , artist and curator (b. 1946)
  • Mark Brownson , baseball player (b. 1975)
  • William Melvin Kelley , novelist (b. 1937)
  • Carter Manny , architect (b. 1918)
  • Edward Tipper , World War II veteran (b. 1921)
  • David Peter Battaglia , politician and educator (b. 1931)
  • Alvin Baldus , politician (b. 1926)
  • Tom Drake , wrestler and politician (b. 1930)
  • John Hilton , football player (b. 1942)
  • George Maderos , football player (b. 1933)
  • Perry McGriff , football player and politician (b. 1937)
  • Jeff Sauer , ice hockey coach (b. 1943)
  • Seymour Jonathan Singer , 92, cell biologist (b. 1924)
  • Marjorie Corcoran , particle physicist (b. 1950)
  • Anthony French , English-born physicist (b. 1920)
  • Joseph Green , academic and theatre producer (b. 1934)
  • John M. Hayes , geochemist (b. 1940)
  • Benny Perrin , football player (b. 1959)
  • Don Trousdell , artist
  • John Howes , professor of Asian studies (b. 1924)
  • Marc Spitz , writer and music journalist (b. 1969)
  • David Axelrod , arranger, composer and producer (b. 1933)
  • Ray Christensen , sportscaster (b. 1924)
  • Sonny Geraci , singer (b. 1946)
  • Thomas Lux , poet (b. 1946)
  • Irwin Corey , comedian (b. 1914)
  • Marc Drogin , writer and illustrator (b. 1936)
  • Neil Gehrels , 64, astronomer (b. 1952)
  • Stan Jones , politician (b. 1949)
  • Raymond Smullyan , mathematician and philosopher (b. 1919)
  • Christine Dolce , MySpace celebrity and cosmetologist (b. 1981)
  • Pat Beard , politician (b. 1947)
  • Richard Hatch , actor (b. 1945) [296]
  • Sidney H. Liebson , scientist (b. 1920)
  • Richard DuFour , educational researcher (b. 1947)
  • Arthur Hyman , academic (b. 1921)
  • Marcel Dandeneau , 85, politician (b. 1931)
  • Barbara Gelb , biographer, playwright and journalist (b. 1926)
  • Packy , Asian elephant (b. 1962)
  • Warren Unna , journalist (b. 1923)
  • Roger Boas , politician (b. 1921)
  • Albert Boscov , businessman (b. 1929)
  • Edward Bryant , science fiction and horror writer (b. 1945)
  • H. R. Crawford , real estate developer and politician (b. 1939)
  • Maxine Grimm , religious figure (b. 1914)
  • Mike Ilitch , businessman (b. 1929)
  • Dahlov Ipcar , painter and author (b. 1917)
  • Hal Moore , lieutenant general and author (b. 1922)
  • Royal Delta , racehorse (b. 2008)
  • Bruno A. Boley , Italian-born engineer (b. 1924)
  • Jeremy Geathers , arena football player (b. 1986)
  • Chavo Guerrero Sr. , professional wrestler (b. 1949)
  • Harvey Lichtenstein , arts administrator (b. 1929)
  • Dave Adolph , football coach (b. 1937)
  • Jay Bontatibus , actor (b. 1964)
  • Barbara Carroll , jazz pianist (b. 1925)
  • Al Jarreau , jazz and R&B singer (b. 1940)
  • Quentin Moses , football player (b. 1983)
  • Clint Roberts , politician (b. 1935)
  • Stacy Bromberg , darts player (b. 1956)
  • Melvin Defleur , mass communications scholar (b. 1923)
  • Bruce Lansbury , British-born television producer and screenwriter (b. 1930)
  • Lucky Pulpit , racehorse (b. 2001)
  • Darrell K. Smith , football player (b. 1961)
  • February 14 – Joseph Neal , politician (b. 1950)
  • E-Dubble , rap artist (b. 1982)
  • Rich Ingold , arena football player and coach (b. 1963)
  • Loren Wiseman , game designer (b. 1951)
  • George Steele , professional wrestler and actor (b. 1937)
  • Duke Washington , football player (b. 1933)
  • Charles L. Bartlett , journalist (b. 1921)
  • Nicole Bass , bodybuilder, professional wrestler and actress (b. 1964)
  • Warren Frost , actor (b. 1925)
  • Theodore J. Lowi , political scientist (b. 1931)
  • Robert H. Michel , politician (b. 1923)
  • Leonard Myers , football player (b. 1978)
  • Michael Novak , Roman Catholic theologian (b. 1933)
  • Tom Regan , philosopher and animal rights advocate (b. 1938)
  • Andrew Schneider , journalist (b. 1942)
  • Jerome Tuccille , writer and activist (b. 1937)
  • Magnus Wenninger , mathematician (b. 1919)
  • Nick Dupree , 34, disability rights activist (b. 1982)
  • Tom Larson , politician (b. 1948)
  • Norma McCorvey , political activist, plaintiff in U.S. Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade (b. 1947)
  • Richard Schickel , film critic (b. 1933)
  • Lawrence F. Snowden , military officer (b. 1921)
  • Clyde Stubblefield , drummer (b. 1943)
  • Charismatic , racehorse (b. 1996)
  • Larry Coryell , jazz guitarist (b. 1943)
  • Karla M. Gray , judge (b. 1947)
  • Darryl Hammond , arena football player (b. 1967)
  • John S. Wold , politician (b. 1916)
  • Marilyn B. Young , historian (b. 1937)
  • Richard J. Coffee, politician (b. 1925)
  • Ilene Berns , record executive (b. 1943)
  • Brenda Buttner , news correspondent (b. 1961)
  • Mildred Dresselhaus , nanotechnologist (b. 1930)
  • Jamie Fox , politician and political strategist (b. 1954)
  • Kenneth Arrow , economist (b. 1921)
  • Douglas Coe , evangelical leader (b. 1928)
  • Edwin Kessler , atmospheric scientist (b. 1928)
  • Stanisław Skrowaczewski , Polish-born conductor and composer (b. 1923)
  • Ed Garvey , labor attorney (b. 1940)
  • J. Karl Hedrick , mechanical engineer (b. 1944)
  • Ralph A. Loveys , politician (b. 1929)
  • Ward Chamberlin , public broadcasting executive (b. 1921)
  • Alan Colmes , political commentator (b. 1950)
  • Bernie Custis , CFL player (b. 1928)
  • David Keightley , sinologist (b. 1932)
  • Leon Ware , musician, record producer, and songwriter (b. 1940)
  • Daryl , magician (b. 1955)
  • Ronald T. Halverson , religious leader and politician (b. 1936)
  • Fred Oldfield , painter (b. 1918)
  • Scott Lew , screenwriter (b. 1968)
  • Eric Miller , record producer (b. 1941)
  • Bill Paxton , actor (b. 1955)
  • Chez Pazienza , journalist, author and television producer (b. 1969)
  • Jack Pope , judge, attorney and author (b. 1913)
  • Dorothy P. Rice , economist (b. 1922)
  • Boaz Vaadia , Israeli-born sculptor (b. 1951)
  • Jay Cronley , writer (b. 1943)
  • Eugene Garfield , linguist (b. 1925)
  • Ned Garver , baseball pitcher (b. 1925)
  • Sunny Hale , polo player (b. 1968)
  • Joseph Wapner , judge and television personality (b. 1919) [297]
  • February 27 – John Harlan , radio and television personality (b. 1925)
  • Spencer Hays , art collector (b. 1936)
  • Marian Javits , arts patron (b. 1925)
  • Paul Kangas , broadcaster (b. 1937)
  • Ric Marlow , songwriter (b. 1925)
  • Joseph A. Panuska , educator (b. 1927)
  • Dave Rosenfield , baseball manager (b. 1929)

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  • Paula Fox , author (b. 1923)
  • Richard Karron , actor (b. 1934)
  • Shirley Palesh , baseball player (b. 1929)
  • Wally Pikal , musician and entertainer (b. 1927)
  • Michael M. Ryan , actor (b. 1929)
  • Howard Schmidt , cybersecurity advisor (b. 1949)
  • John D. Schneider , lawyer and politician (b. 1937)
  • Míriam Colón , Puerto Rican actress (b. 1936)
  • Tommy Page , American singer-songwriter (b. 1970)
  • Lyle Ritz , musician (b. 1930)
  • Joe Rogers , businessman, co-founder of Waffle House (b. 1919)
  • Stephen Ross , economist (b. 1944)
  • Lawrence Holofcener , American-British sculptor, writer, actor, and director (b. 1926)
  • Eugene N. Kozloff , marine biologist and botanist (b. 1920)
  • Helen M. Marshall , politician (b. 1929)
  • Thomas Collier Platt Jr. , federal judge (b. 1925)
  • Thomas Starzl , surgeon and researcher (b. 1926)
  • Clayton Yeutter , secretary of agriculture (b. 1930)
  • Anthony C. Beilenson , politician (b. 1932)
  • Florence S. Jacobsen , Mormon leader and missionary (b. 1913)
  • Jay Lynch , underground comics artist, writer, and editor (b. 1945)
  • Burke Day , politician (b. 1954)
  • Bill Hougland , basketball player (b. 1930)
  • Robert Osborne , film historian and television host (b. 1932)
  • Helen Sommers , politician (b. 1932)
  • Lynne Stewart , defense attorney and convicted criminal (b. 1939)
  • Ron Bass , wrestler (b. 1948)
  • George Andrew Olah , Hungarian-born Nobel chemist (b. 1927)
  • Dave Valentin , jazz flautist (b. 1952)
  • Bobby Byrne , American cinematographer (b. 1931)
  • Bill Hands , American baseball player (b. 1940)
  • Peter Karoff , American philanthropist (b. 1937)
  • Bob Altman , comedian (b. 1931)
  • Carol Field , writer and librarian (b. 1940)
  • Joni Sledge , singer and songwriter (b. 1956)
  • Kika de la Garza , politician (b. 1927)
  • Amy Krouse Rosenthal , author (b. 1965)
  • Rebecca Bace , American computer scientist (b. 1955)
  • Lillie Mae Bradford , American civil rights activist (b. 1928)
  • Thomas H. Friedkin , American businessman (b. 1935)
  • Jack H. Harris , American film producer (b. 1918)
  • Royal Robbins , American rock climber (b. 1934)
  • John Van de Kamp , American politician (b. 1935)
  • John Wheatcroft , American writer and teacher (b. 1925)
  • March 15 – Bob Bruce , baseball player (b. 1933)
  • March 16 – James Cotton , blues artist (b. 1935)
  • Auntie Fee , YouTube personality (b. 1957)
  • Lawrence Montaigne , American actor, writer, dancer, and stuntman (b. 1931)
  • Chuck Berry , musician (b. 1926)
  • Bernie Wrightson , comic artist (b. 1948)
  • Tom Amberry , podiatrist (b. 1922)
  • March 19 – Jimmy Breslin , journalist and author (b. 1928)
  • Andy Coan , swimmer (b. 1958)
  • Edward Joseph McManus , politician (b. 1920)
  • Chandler Robbins , ornithologist (b. 1918)
  • David Rockefeller , banker (b. 1915)
  • Edgar Smith , convicted murderer (b. 1934)
  • March 21 – Chuck Barris , game show creator, producer, and host (b. 1929)
  • Sib Hashian , American drummer (b. 1949)
  • Tomas Milian , Cuban-American actor (b. 1933)
  • Lola Albright , singer and actress (b. 1924)
  • William H. Keeler , cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church (b. 1931)
  • March 25 – J. Allen Adams , politician and lawyer (b. 1932)
  • Jimmy Dotson , blues singer (b. 1933)
  • Darlene Cates , actress (b. 1947)
  • March 27 – Chelsea Brown , American actress (b. 1942)
  • Deane R. Hinton , American diplomat and ambassador (b. 1923)
  • William McPherson , American writer and journalist (b. 1933)
  • Bill Minor , American journalist (b. 1922)
  • Alexei Alexeyevich Abrikosov , Russian-American theoretical physicist (b. 1928)
  • John Collias , American western artist (b. 1918)
  • Wayne Duke , American collegiate athletic executive (b. 1928)
  • Steen Miles , American politician (b. 1946)
  • Linwood Sexton , American football player (b. 1926)
  • Katherine Smith , American Navajo activist (b. 1918)
  • Ken Sparks , American football coach and player (b. 1944)
  • Richard Bustillo , American martial arts instructor (b. 1941)
  • Rosie Hamlin , American singer (b. 1945)
  • Donald Harvey , American serial killer (b. 1952)
  • Robert Mahoney , American politician (b. 1921)
  • Alfred C. Marble Jr. , American Episcopal prelate (b. 1936)
  • Hattie Peterson , American baseball player (b. 1930)
  • Richard Nelson Bolles , American writer (b. 1926)
  • William Thaddeus Coleman Jr. , Secretary of Transportation (b. 1920)
  • Jerrier A. Haddad , American computer engineer (b. 1922)
  • James Hadnot , American football player (b. 1957)
  • James Clinkscales Hill , American jurist (b. 1923)
  • Radley Metzger , American pornographic filmmaker (b. 1928)
  • Amy Ridenour , American conservative political activist (b. 1960)
  • James Rosenquist , American artist (b. 1934)

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  • Sharon Ambrose , politician, member of the Council of the District of Columbia (b. 1939)
  • Gary Austin , theatre writer and director (b. 1941)
  • Lonnie Brooks , blues guitarist and singer (b. 1933)
  • Bob Cunningham , jazz bassist (b. 1934)
  • Frederick Bernard Lacey , jurist (b. 1920)
  • Louis Sarno , musicologist and author (b. 1954)
  • Burton Watson , translator (b. 1925)
  • Sam Ard , racecar driver (b. 1939)
  • Ken Donnelly , politician (b. 1950)
  • Rhubarb Jones , country disc jockey and professional wrestling ring announcer (b. 1951)
  • Hate Man , writer (b. 1936)
  • Leonard Litwin , real estate developer (b. 1914)
  • Gerard Washnitzer , mathematician (b. 1926)
  • Abraham S. Fischler , academic (b. 1928)
  • John T. Knox , politician and lawyer (b. 1924)
  • Enrico Quarantelli , sociologist (b. 1924)
  • Roy Sievers , baseball player (b. 1926)
  • Thomas Tackaberry , military officer (b. 1923)
  • Gary W. Thomas , judge (b. 1938)
  • William Walaska , politician and senator (b. 1946)
  • Tobias Barry , American politician (b. 1924)
  • George Mostow , American mathematician (b. 1923)
  • Arthur Bisguier , chess grandmaster and writer (b. 1929)
  • John Chittick , HIV/AIDS activist (b. 1948)
  • David Gove , ice hockey player and coach (b. 1978)
  • Hugh Montgomery , intelligence officer (b. 1956)
  • Paul O'Neill , producer, composer and songwriter (b. 1956)
  • George Snyder , politician and businessman (b. 1929)
  • Frank Attkisson , politician (b. 1955)
  • Bob Cerv , baseball player (b. 1925)
  • Don Rickles , comedian (b. 1926)
  • Hugh Montgomery , diplomat and intelligence officer (b. 1923)
  • Clyde See , politician and lawyer (b. 1941)
  • Derrick Jensen , football player (b. 1956)
  • Patricia McKissack , children's writer (b. 1944)
  • Glenn O'Brien , journalist and editor (b. 1947)
  • Craig Payne , boxer (b. 1961)
  • Ben Speer , musician (b. 1930)
  • Alicia Appleman-Jurman , 86, Polish-born Israeli-American memoirist (b. 1930)
  • Stephen Caracappa , NYPD police detective and organized crime operative (b. 1942)
  • Eugene Lang , philanthropist (b. 1919)
  • Kim Plainfield , jazz drummer (b. 1954)
  • Donald Sarason , mathematician (b. 1933)
  • Richard Kenneth Fox , American diplomat (b. 1925)
  • Peter Hansen , American actor (b. 1921)
  • Harry Huskey , American computer scientist (b. 1915)
  • Bob Wootton , American country guitarist (b. 1941)
  • Jean Worthley , American naturalist and television presenter (b. 1924)
  • Al Besselink , American professional golfer (b. 1923)
  • Linda Hopkins , American actress and singer (b. 1924)
  • April 11 – J. Geils , American musician (b. 1946)
  • April 12 – Charlie Murphy , actor, comedian, voice artist and writer (b. 1959)
  • Vic Barnhart , American baseball player (b. 1922)
  • Dennis Edwards Jr. , American judge (b. 1921)
  • Daniel Guice , American politician (b. 1924)
  • Robert D. Marta , American film camera operator (b. 1943)
  • Dan Rooney , American football executive and diplomat, Ambassador to Ireland (b. 1932)
  • Robert Taylor , computer scientist (b. 1932)
  • Robert H. Abel , American author (b. 1941)
  • John Thomas Curtin , American jurist (b. 1921)
  • Henry Hillman , American venture capitalist and philanthropist (b. 1918)
  • Bruce Langhorne , American folk musician (b. 1938)
  • Hugh Pitts , American football player (b. 1933)
  • Patti Smith , American politician (b. 1946)
  • Allan Holdsworth , British guitarist and composer (b. 1946)
  • Matt Holt , singer (b. 1977)
  • Clifton James , American actor (b. 1920)
  • Sylvia Moy , American singer-songwriter (b. 1938)
  • Robert B. Hibbs , American Episcopal prelate (b. 1932)
  • Dawson Mathis , politician (b. 1940)
  • John T. Noonan Jr. , judge (b. 1926)
  • Trish Vradenburg , American screenwriter (b. 1946)
  • Vic Albury , American baseball player (b. 1947)
  • Bill Anderson , American football player (b. 1936)
  • David Ball , American Episcopal prelate (b. 1926)
  • David Chandler , American physical chemist (b. 1944)
  • Raymond Han , American painter (b. 1931)
  • Barkley L. Hendricks , American painter (b. 1944)
  • Dorrance Hill Hamilton , American philanthropist (b. 1928)
  • Jaak Panksepp , Estonian-born American neuroscientist (b. 1942)
  • David H. Rodgers , American politician (b. 1923)
  • J. C. Spink , American producer (b. 1971)
  • April 19 – Aaron Hernandez , Former Tight End for the New England Patriots , Convicted Murderer (b. 1989)
  • April 20 – Cuba Gooding Sr. , soul singer (b. 1944)
  • Carl Christ , American economist (b. 1923)
  • Maria Zhorella Fedorova , Austrian-born American opera singer and teacher (b. 1915)
  • Sandy Gallin , American talent agent and producer (b. 1940)
  • John Grinold , American college athletic director (b. 1935)
  • Kristine Jepson , American mezzo-soprano (b. 1962)
  • Robert H. Shaffer , American academic (b. 1915)
  • Hector Acebes , American photographer (b. 1920)
  • Hubert Dreyfus , philosopher (b. 1929)
  • William Hjortsberg , American novelist and screenwriter (b. 1940)
  • Jess Kersey , American basketball official (b. 1940)
  • Alvin H. Kukuk , American politician (b. 1937)
  • Erin Moran , actress (b. 1960)
  • R. Cooper White Jr. , American politician (b. 1926)
  • Jaynne Bittner , American baseball player (b. 1925)
  • Anne Pippin Burnett , American classics scholar (b. 1925)
  • Kathleen Crowley , actress (b. 1929)
  • Ana Delfosse , Chilean-born American race-car driver and mechanic (b. 1931)
  • Kate O'Beirne , American political columnist, editor and commentator (b. 1949)
  • Ken Sears , basketball player (b. 1933)
  • April 24 – Don Gordon , actor (b. 1926)
  • Jonathan Demme , film director (b. 1944)
  • Tom Forkner , American businessman and lawyer (b. 1918)
  • Andrew G. Frommelt , American politician (b. 1921)
  • James Knoll Gardner , American jurist (b. 1940)
  • Robert Hilder , American jurist (b. 1949)
  • Chet Kalm , American artist (b. 1925)
  • Dennis Karjala , American law professor (b. 1939)
  • William L. Kirk , American air force general (b. 1932)
  • Daniel Francis Merriam , American geologist (b. 1926)
  • Harold Van Heuvelen , American composer and teacher (b. 1918)
  • Joanna Brouk , American electronic musician and composer (b. 1948)
  • Mariano Gagnon , American missionary (b. 1929)
  • Richard Haynes , lawyer (b. 1927)
  • Janelle Kirtley , American water skier (b. 1943)
  • Billy Scott , American race car driver (b. 1948)
  • John Shifflett , American jazz musician (b. 1952)
  • Patrick Thaddeus , American astronomer (b. 1932)
  • Anna Lee Carroll , American actress (b. 1930)
  • Lorna Gray , American actress (b. 1917)
  • Howard Hart , American CIA officer (b. 1940)
  • Preston Henn , American entrepreneur (b. 1932)
  • Jack Imel , American entertainer (b. 1932)
  • Ray Kogovsek , American politician (b. 1941)
  • Tam Spiva , American screenwriter (b. 1932)
  • Jean Stein , American author and editor (b. 1933)

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  • Richard Basciano , real estate developer (b. 1925)
  • Bruce Hampton , guitarist (b. 1947)
  • William M. Hoffman , playwright and editor (b. 1939)
  • Alice Langtry , politician (b. 1932)
  • Mike Lowry , politician; Governor of Washington from 1993 to 1997 (b. 1939)
  • Sam Mele , baseball player and manager (b. 1922)
  • Janet Pilgrim , model (b. 1934)
  • Stanley Weston , toy inventor (b. 1933)
  • Anne Morrissy Merick , journalist (b. 1933)
  • George Hugh Niederauer , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1936)
  • T. Gary Rogers , business executive (b. 1943)
  • Leo K. Thorsness , U.S. Air Force colonel and politician (b. 1932)
  • Alma W. Byrd , politician (b. 1924)
  • Paul Hanneman , politician (b. 1936)
  • Charles Hoffer , music educator (b. 1929)
  • Casey Jones , blues drummer (b. 1939)
  • Irene Smart , politician and judge (b. 1921)
  • William Baumol , economist (b. 1922)
  • Jay Carty , basketball player (b. 1941)
  • William A. Davis Jr. , engineer (b. 1927)
  • C. Jackson Grayson , businessman and FBI agent (b. 1923)
  • Glenna Sue Kidd , baseball player (b. 1933)
  • Richard Pennington , police officer (b. 1947)
  • Edwin Sherin , theatre, film, and television director (b. 1930)
  • Adolph Kiefer , 1936 Olympic swimming gold medalist (b. 1918)
  • Quinn O'Hara , Scottish-born actress and nurse (b. 1941)
  • Michael Zwack , artist (b. 1949)
  • Richard Battey , federal judge (b. 1929)
  • Steven Holcomb , Olympic medalist in bobsledding (b. 1980)
  • Peter Kivy , musicologist (b. 1934)
  • John Schultz , writer (b. 1932)
  • Jack Tilton , art dealer (b. 1951)
  • Peter T. Flawn , geologist (b. 1926)
  • Bob Mimm , racewalker (b. 1924)
  • Rod Monroe , football player (b. 1976)
  • Chuck Orsborn , basketball player and coach and university athletic director (b. 1917)
  • Dave Pell , jazz saxophonist and bandleader (b. 1925)
  • Lee Weissenborn , politician (b. 1929)
  • Dennis H. Farber , painter and photographer (b. 1946)
  • George Irvine , basketball player and coach (b. 1948)
  • Curt Lowens , German-born actor and Holocaust survivor (b. 1925)
  • Allan H. Meltzer , economist (b. 1928)
  • Judith Stein , historian (b. 1940)
  • James S. Sutterlin , author, academic, and diplomat (b. 1922)
  • Clarence Williams , football player (b. 1946)
  • Christopher Boykin , reality television personality (b. 1972)
  • John Kivela , politician (b. 1969)
  • Michael Parks , actor and singer (b. 1940)
  • Wilburn K. Ross , U.S. Army soldier and Medal of Honor recipient (b. 1922)
  • Edward Lunn Young , politician (b. 1920)
  • Joy Byers , songwriter (b. 1934)
  • Greg Forristall , politician (b. 1950)
  • Douglas Netter , television producer and executive (b. 1921)
  • William David Brohn , music arranger (b. 1933)
  • Seaborn Buckalew Jr. , lawyer and judge (b. 1920)
  • John F. Donahue , businessman (b. 1924)
  • Yale Lary , football player, businessman, and politician (b. 1930)
  • Charles A. McClenahan , politician (b. 1941)
  • Bill Dowdy , jazz drummer (b. 1932)
  • Michael Jackson , football player (b. 1969)
  • Sally Jacobsen , journalist and editor (b. 1947)
  • Henri Termeer , Dutch-born biotechnology executive (b. 1946)
  • George A. Thompson , geologist (b. 1919)
  • Simon Vega , educator and businessman (b. 1935)
  • Ron Bontemps , basketball player and Olympic gold medalist (b. 1926)
  • John Cygan , comedian, actor, and voice artist (b. 1954)
  • Thomas H. Paterniti , dentist and politician (b. 1929)
  • Len Rohde , football player (b. 1938)
  • Powers Boothe , actor (b. 1948)
  • Frank Brian , basketball player (b. 1923)
  • Bill Cox , football player (b. 1929)
  • Thomas Vose Daily , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1927)
  • Chuck Davis , dancer and choreographer (b. 1937)
  • Jean Fritz , children's author (b. 1917)
  • Brad Grey , film and television producer (b. 1957)
  • Steve Palermo , American League umpire and shooting survivor (b. 1949)
  • Roxcy Bolton , feminist and women's rights activist (b. 1926)
  • Firuz Kazemzadeh , Russian-born historian (b. 1924)
  • David A Ramey , artist (b. 1939)
  • Unusual Heat , Thoroughbred racehorse (b. 1990)
  • Roger Ailes , television executive, CEO of Fox News (b. 1940)
  • Chris Cornell , musician, singer, and songwriter (b. 1964)
  • Jacque Fresco , futurist and social engineer (b. 1916)
  • Jim McElreath , race car driver (b. 1928)
  • Erwin Potts , business executive (b. 1932)
  • Donald Avenson , politician (b. 1944)
  • Chana Bloch , poet and translator (b. 1940)
  • Rich Buckler , comic book artist (b. 1949)
  • Grady C. Cothen , Baptist minister and university president (b. 1920)
  • Herbert L. Meschke , politician and judge (b. 1928)
  • Ed Mierkowicz , baseball player (b. 1924)
  • Wayne Walker , football player and sportscaster (b. 1936)
  • Joy Corning , politician; Lieutenant Governor of Iowa from 1991 to 1999 (b. 1932)
  • William Clifford Newman , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1928)
  • Jean E. Sammet , computer scientist (b. 1928)
  • Lisa Spoonauer , actress (b. 1972)
  • Kenny Cordray , rock guitarist and songwriter (b. 1954)
  • Jimmy LaFave , country and folk musician (b. 1955)
  • Wayne Simoneau , politician (b. 1935)
  • Larry Wright , cartoonist (b. 1940)
  • Barbara Smith Conrad , operatic mezzo-soprano (b. 1937)
  • Devil His Due , Thoroughbred racehorse (b. 1989)
  • Nicky Hayden , motorcycle racer (b. 1981)
  • Dina Merrill , actress, socialite, and philanthropist (b. 1923)
  • Mickey Roker , jazz drummer (b. 1932)
  • Roger Boesche , political theorist (b. 1948)
  • William Carney , politician; U.S. Representative from New York from 1979 to 1987 (b. 1942)
  • Ben Finney , anthropologist and historian (b. 1933)
  • Cortez Kennedy , football player (b. 1968)
  • Peter Lawler , academic and political consultant (b. 1951)
  • Jerry Perenchio , billionaire businessman and philanthropist (b. 1930)
  • Sonny Randle , football player, coach, and sportscaster (b. 1936)
  • Ann Birstein , novelist, memoirist, and blogger (b. 1927)
  • Denis Johnson , novelist, poet, and playwright (b. 1949)
  • Jared Martin , actor (b. 1941)
  • Ross Rhoads , evangelical pastor (b. 1932)
  • Sonny West , actor and stuntman (b. 1938)
  • Marie Cosindas , photographer (b. 1923)
  • Miguel Méndez , legal scholar (b. 1943)
  • Joel Read , Roman Catholic nun and college president (b. 1925)
  • Saucy Sylvia , Canadian-born comedian and pianist (b. 1920)
  • Zbigniew Brzezinski , Polish-born diplomat and political scientist (b. 1928)
  • Jim Bunning , baseball pitcher and politician; U.S. Senator from Kentucky from 1999 to 2011 (b. 1931)
  • Robert Curtis , basketball player (b. 1990)
  • Robert J. Parins , judge and football executive (b. 1918)
  • Gregg Allman , singer, songwriter, and musician (b. 1947)
  • Fishel Hershkowitz , Czech-born Hasidic rabbi (b. 1922)
  • Robert McCarley , psychiatrist and sleep researcher (b. 1937)
  • Ken Ackerman , radio announcer and news anchor (b. 1922)
  • Frank Deford , sportswriter and novelist (b. 1938)
  • Lawrence Jenkins , World War II pilot and memoirist (b. 1924)
  • Benjamin Melendez , gang leader (b. 1952)
  • Pat Mullins , politician (b. 1938)
  • Wendell Burton , actor and television executive (b. 1947)
  • Ken Cooper , football player and coach (b. 1937)
  • Tom Graham , football player (b. 1950)
  • Daniel Kucera , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1923)
  • Robert Michael Morris , actor (b. 1940)
  • Elena Verdugo , actress (b. 1925)
  • Tino Insana , actor, screenwriter, and film producer (b. 1948)
  • Fred J. Koenekamp , cinematographer (b. 1922)
  • Fred Kummerow , German-born biochemist and centenarian (b. 1914)
  • John May , politician (b. 1950)

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • Jack McCloskey , basketball player, coach, and executive (b. 1925)
  • Charles Simmons , author (b. 1924)
  • Gordon Christian , ice hockey player (b. 1927)
  • Iakovos Garmatis , Greek-born Eastern Orthodox metropolitan (b. 1928)
  • Jack O'Neill , businessman (b. 1923)
  • Herm Starrette , baseball player (b. 1936)
  • David Choby , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1947)
  • Sara Ehrman , political activist (b. 1919)
  • James E. Martin , educator and university president (b. 1932)
  • Jimmy Piersall , baseball player (b. 1929)
  • Lawrence Weed , physician and educator (b. 1923)
  • Thomas C. Perry , businessman and politician (b. 1941)
  • Roger Smith , actor, producer, and screenwriter (b. 1932)
  • Jack Trout , business and marketing theorist (b. 1935)
  • Kathryn Stripling Byer , poet (b. 1944)
  • Victor Gold , journalist and political consultant (b. 1928)
  • Marilyn Hall , Canadian-born television and theatre producer (b. 1927)
  • William Krisel , Chinese-born architect (b. 1924)
  • Rita Riggs , costume designer (b. 1930)
  • John Bower , skier (b. 1940)
  • Walter Noll , German-born mathematician (b. 1925)
  • James Hardy , football player (b. 1985)
  • Holy Bull , Thoroughbred racehorse (b. 1991)
  • Robert S. Leiken , political scientist (b. 1939)
  • Earl Lestz , film and television executive (b. 1939)
  • Patsy Terrell , politician (b. 1962)
  • Ervin A. Gonzalez , lawyer (b. 1960)
  • Glenne Headly , actress (b. 1955)
  • Norro Wilson , country musician, songwriter, and producer (b. 1938)
  • Vic Edelbrock Jr. , businessman (b. 1936)
  • Adam West , actor (b. 1928)
  • John C. Yoder , judge and politician (b. 1951)
  • Herma Hill Kay , law professor and academic administrator (b. 1934)
  • Jerry Nelson , astronomer (b. 1944)
  • Grace Berg Schaible , lawyer and politician (b. 1925)
  • Samuel V. Wilson , U.S. Army general; Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency 1976–77 (b. 1923)
  • Herman T. Costello , politician (b. 1920)
  • David Fromkin , lawyer and historian (b. 1932)
  • Rosalie Sorrels , folk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)
  • Morton N. Cohen , author and literary scholar (b. 1921)
  • David W. Frank , thespian and educator (b. 1949)
  • Jim Galton , business executive (b. 1924)
  • Marvin Herman Shoob , U.S. federal judge (b. 1923)
  • Philip Gossett , musicologist (b. 1941)
  • A. R. Gurney , playwright and novelist (b. 1930)
  • Hansel , Thoroughbred racehorse (b. 1988)
  • Arthur J. Jackson , U.S. Marine Corps officer and Medal of Honor recipient (b. 1924)
  • Don Matthews , football player and CFL coach (b. 1939)
  • David L. Armstrong , politician (b. 1941)
  • Bill Dana , comedian, actor, and screenwriter (b. 1924)
  • Phyllis A. Kravitch , federal judge (b. 1920)
  • John G. Avildsen , film director (b. 1935)
  • Stephen Furst , actor and film and television director (b. 1955)
  • Curt Hanson , politician (b. 1943)
  • Elias Burstein , physicist (b. 1917)
  • Gailanne Cariddi , politician (b. 1953)
  • Larry Grantham , football player (b. 1938)
  • Thara Memory , jazz trumpeter (b. 1949)
  • Venus Ramey , Miss America winner, farmer, and activist (b. 1924)
  • Hans Breder , German-born artist and educator (b. 1935)
  • Tony Liscio , football player (b. 1940)
  • Chris Murrell , jazz and gospel singer (b. 1956)
  • Simon Nelson , mass murderer (b. 1931)
  • Tony DiCicco , soccer player and coach (b. 1948)
  • Otto Warmbier , college student and North Korea detainee (b. 1994)
  • Roger D. Abrahams , folklorist (b. 1933)
  • Prodigy , rapper (b. 1974)
  • Belton Richard , Cajun accordionist (b. 1939)
  • Robert M. Shoemaker , U.S. Army general (b. 1924)
  • Howard Witt , actor (b. 1932)
  • Richard Benson , photographer, printer, and educator (b. 1943)
  • Frank Kush , football player and coach (b. 1929)
  • Keith Loneker , football player and actor (b. 1971)
  • Sheila Michaels , feminist and civil rights activist (b. 1939)
  • John R. Quinn , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1929)
  • John E. Sarno , physician and writer (b. 1923)
  • Sandy Tatum , attorney and golf administrator (b. 1920)
  • Gabe Pressman , television journalist (b. 1924)
  • Meir Zlotowitz , Orthodox Jewish rabbi, author, and translator (b. 1943)
  • Loren Janes , stuntman (b. 1931)
  • Parker Lee McDonald , judge (b. 1924)
  • Hal Fryar , actor and television personality (b. 1927)
  • Skip Homeier , American actor (b. 1930)
  • June 26 – Doug Peterson , yacht designer (b. 1945)
  • Geri Allen , jazz pianist, composer, and educator (b. 1957)
  • Peter L. Berger , sociologist and theologian (b. 1929)
  • Better Talk Now , Thoroughbred racehorse (b. 1999)
  • Tom Corcoran , alpine skier (b. 1931)
  • Mary Evelyn Blagg Huey , educator and college president (b. 1922)
  • Anthony Young , baseball pitcher (b. 1966)
  • June 28 – Phil Cohran , jazz trumpeter (b. 1927)
  • Chuck Renslow , businessman and LGBT activist (b. 1929)
  • Michael Vickery , historian (b. 1931)
  • Russ Adams , tennis photographer (b. 1930)
  • Mitchell Henry , football player (b. 1992)
  • Darrall Imhoff , basketball player (b. 1938)
  • Max Runager , football player (b. 1956)

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • Norman Dorsen , jurist and civil rights activist (b. 1930)
  • Paul Hardin III , academic administrator (b. 1931)
  • Stevie Ryan , actress (b. 1984)
  • Jack Collom , poet (b. 1931)
  • David W. Vincent , baseball writer and statistician (b. 1949)
  • Spencer Johnson , self-help writer (b. 1938)
  • Theodore Kanavas , politician (b. 1961)
  • John Blackwell , jazz and funk drummer (b. 1973)
  • Gene Conley , baseball and basketball player (b. 1930)
  • Ji-Tu Cumbuka , actor (b. 1940)
  • John S. Palmore , judge (b. 1917)
  • David Yewdall , sound editor (b. 1951)
  • July 5 – Tinners Way , Thoroughbred racehorse (b. 1990)
  • Willie Stevenson Glanton , lawyer and politician (b. 1922)
  • Joan Boocock Lee , British-born voice actress (b. 1922)
  • William Morva , convicted murderer (b. 1982)
  • Claude Hall , journalist and magazine editor
  • Diego E. Hernández , U.S. Navy officer (b. 1934)
  • Kenneth Silverman , biographer (b. 1936)
  • Nelsan Ellis , actor (b. 1977)
  • Bob Lubbers , comics artist (b. 1922)
  • Wally Burr , voice actor and television director (b. 1926)
  • Ed Crawford , football player (b. 1934)
  • Neal Patterson , business executive (b. 1949)
  • Jack Shaheen , cultural critic (b. 1935)
  • David Wilstein , real estate developer and philanthropist (b. 1928)
  • Peter Alfond , billionaire investor and philanthropist (b. 1952)
  • Jim Bush , track and field coach (b. 1926)
  • July 11 – Joseph Fire Crow , Cheyenne flutist (b. 1958/1959)
  • Chuck Blazer , soccer administrator (b. 1945)
  • S. Allen Counter , neuroscientist, polar explorer, and university administrator (b. 1944)
  • Sam Glanzman , comics artist and writer (b. 1924)
  • Charles Bachman , computer scientist (b. 1924)
  • Keith Baird , Barbadian-born educator and linguist (b. 1923)
  • Gertrude Poe , journalist and lawyer (b. 1915)
  • Carl E. Reichardt , banking executive (b. 1931)
  • Mahi Beamer , singer, composer, and dancer (b. 1928)
  • Wm. Theodore de Bary , sinologist (b. 1919)
  • William "Hootie" Johnson , banker and golf administrator (b. 1931)
  • Warrick L. Carter , music educator and college administrator (b. 1942)
  • Martin Landau , actor (b. 1928)
  • Babe Parilli , football player (b. 1930)
  • Bob Wolff , sportscaster (b. 1920)
  • Jerry Bird , basketball player (b. 1934)
  • Tom Mitchell , football player (b. 1944)
  • Clancy Sigal , writer (b. 1926)
  • Evan Helmuth , actor (b. 1977)
  • Raymond Sackler , physician and philanthropist (b. 1920)
  • Ben's Cat , Thoroughbred racehorse (b. 2006)
  • Jean Murrell Capers , judge and centenarian (b. 1913)
  • Herbert Needleman , pediatrician and psychiatrist (b. 1927)
  • Andrew Paulson , writer, photographer, and entrepreneur (b. 1958)
  • John Rheinecker , baseball player (b. 1979)
  • Red West , actor, stunt performer, and songwriter (b. 1936)
  • Jake Butcher , banker and politician (b. 1936)
  • Charles Weston Houck , federal judge (b. 1933)
  • Ralph Regula , U.S. Representative from Ohio (b. 1924)
  • Fenwick Smith , classical flutist (b. 1949)
  • Chester Bennington , rock singer and songwriter (b. 1976)
  • Jesse Kalisher , art photographer (b. 1962)
  • Kenneth Jay Lane , jewelry designer and socialite (b. 1932)
  • Joseph Rago , political writer and journalist (b. 1983)
  • Jonathan Shurberg , lawyer and politician (b. 1963)
  • Howard Eichenbaum , psychologist and neuroscientist (b. 1947)
  • John Heard , actor (b. 1945)
  • Lonnie "Bo" Pilgrim , businessman (b. 1928)
  • Stubbs , cat and honorary mayor (b. 1997)
  • Margo Chase , graphic designer (b. 1958)
  • Haddon Robinson , evangelical author and seminary leader (b. 1931)
  • Jim Vance , television news anchor (b. 1942)
  • Dave Cogdill , politician (b. 1950)
  • Bob DeMoss , football player and coach (b. 1927)
  • Thomas Fleming , historian and novelist (b. 1927)
  • John Kundla , basketball coach (b. 1916)
  • Snooty , manatee (b. 1948)
  • Flo Steinberg , comics publisher (b. 1939)
  • Gretel Bergmann , German-born high jumper (b. 1914)
  • Marian Diamond , neuroscientist (b. 1926)
  • Buddy Fletcher , politician (b. 1932)
  • Michael Johnson , singer-songwriter (b. 1944)
  • Barbara Sinatra , model and showgirl (b. 1927)
  • Lyle Smith , football and basketball player and coach (b. 1916)
  • Billy Joe Walker Jr. , country and New Age guitarist, songwriter, and record producer (b. 1952)
  • Cool "Disco" Dan , graffiti artist (b. 1969)
  • Patti Deutsch , actress and comedian (b. 1943)
  • June Foray , voice actress (b. 1917)
  • Lawrence Pezzulo , diplomat (b. 1926)
  • Ronald Phillips , convicted murderer (b. 1973)
  • Cheri Maples , police officer, peace activist, and dharma instructor (b. 1952)
  • D. L. Menard , Cajun musician (b. 1932)
  • Sam Shepard , playwright, actor, screenwriter, and director (b. 1943)
  • Marty Sklar , Disney imagineer (b. 1934)
  • John G. Morris , photo editor (b. 1916)
  • Warren Keith Urbom , federal judge (b. 1925)
  • Dave Grayson , football player (b. 1939)
  • Lee May , baseball player (b. 1943)
  • Piotr S. Wandycz , Polish-born historian (b. 1923)
  • July 30 – Steadman Upham , archaeologist and university president (b. 1949)
  • Ray Albright , banker and politician (b. 1934)
  • Chuck Loeb , jazz guitarist (b. 1955)
  • Michael O'Nan , mathematician (b. 1943)

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • Jeffrey Brotman , attorney and entrepreneur (b. 1942)
  • Mariann Mayberry , actress (b. 1965)
  • Bud Moore , racing driver (b. 1941)
  • John Reaves , football player (b. 1950)
  • Marshall Goldman , economist (b. 1930)
  • Judith Jones , book editor and food writer (b. 1924)
  • Daniel Licht , film composer (b. 1957)
  • Jim Marrs , journalist and conspiracy theorist (b. 1943)
  • Ara Parseghian , football player and coach (b. 1923)
  • Richard Dudman , journalist (b. 1918)
  • Ty Hardin , actor (b. 1930)
  • Dickie Hemric , basketball player (b. 1933)
  • Alan Peckolick , graphic designer (b. 1940)
  • Walter Levin , German-born violinist and music teacher (b. 1924)
  • Jessy Serrata , Tejano singer and musician (b. 1953)
  • George Bundy Smith , lawyer and judge (b. 1937)
  • Mark White , lawyer and politician; 43rd Governor of Texas (b. 1940)
  • Darren Daulton , baseball player (b. 1962)
  • Dick Locher , cartoonist (b. 1929)
  • David Maslanka , composer (b. 1949)
  • Daniel McKinnon , ice hockey player and Olympic silver medalist (b. 1922)
  • Don Baylor , baseball player and manager (b. 1949)
  • Chantek , hybrid orangutan (b. 1977)
  • Patsy Ticer , politician (b. 1935)
  • Glen Campbell , country singer-songwriter and guitarist (b. 1936)
  • Barbara Cook , musical theatre singer and actress (b. 1927)
  • Max De Pree , businessman and motivational writer (b. 1924)
  • Arlene Gottfried , photographer (b. 1950)
  • Ken Kaiser , American League umpire (b. 1945)
  • Dick MacPherson , football coach (b. 1930)
  • Cathleen Synge Morawetz , Canadian-born mathematician (b. 1923)
  • Al McCandless , politician; U.S. Representative from California (1983–1995) (b. 1927)
  • Robert Joseph Shaheen , Maronite Catholic bishop (b. 1937)
  • Janie Shores , Supreme Court of Alabama justice (b. 1932)
  • August 11 – Neil Chayet , lawyer and radio personality (b. 1939)
  • August 12 – John F. Russo , politician (b. 1933)
  • Joseph Bologna , actor (b. 1934)
  • Nick Mantis , basketball player (b. 1935)
  • Frank Broyles , football player and coach (b. 1924)
  • Franklin Cleckley , law professor and judge (b. 1940)
  • Benard Ighner , jazz singer and musician (b. 1945)
  • Vern Ehlers , politician; U.S. Representative from Michigan (1993–2011) (b. 1934)
  • Kasatka , killer whale (b. 1976)
  • Tom Hawkins , basketball player (b. 1936)
  • Ross Johnson , politician and lawyer (b. 1939)
  • Lester Williams , football player (b. 1959)
  • Francis X. DiLorenzo , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1942)
  • Sonny Landham , actor and stunt performer (b. 1941)
  • M. T. Liggett , folk sculptor (b. 1930)
  • Sonny Burgess , rockabilly singer and guitarist (b. 1929)
  • Arthur J. Finkelstein , political consultant (b. 1945)
  • Venero Mangano , mobster (b. 1921)
  • Charles R. Bentley , glaciologist and geophysicist (b. 1929)
  • Janusz Glowacki , Polish-born playwright and screenwriter (b. 1938)
  • Dick Gregory , comedian and civil rights activist (b. 1932)
  • Jorge Rodriguez-Chomat , Cuban-born politician and judge (b. 1945)
  • Ed Sharockman , football player (b. 1939)
  • Bea Wain , jazz singer (b. 1917)
  • Fredell Lack , classical violinist (b. 1922)
  • Jerry Lewis , comedian, actor, filmmaker, and humanitarian (b. 1926)
  • Shane Sieg , racing driver (b. 1982)
  • Dianne de Las Casas , Philippine-born writer and storyteller (b. 1970)
  • Greg Evers , politician (b. 1955)
  • Thomas Meehan , playwright and screenwriter (b. 1929)
  • Don Nichols , motorsport team owner (b. 1924)
  • Felo Ramírez , Cuban-born sportscaster (b. 1923)
  • John Abercrombie , jazz guitarist (b. 1944)
  • Thomas W. Blackwell , politician (b. 1958)
  • Jim Whelan , politician (b. 1948)
  • George A. Keyworth II , nuclear physicist (b. 1939)
  • Joe Klein , baseball executive (b. 1942)
  • Jack Rosenthal , journalist and editor (b. 1935)
  • Susan Vreeland , novelist (b. 1946)
  • Cecil Andrus , politician; 26th and 28th Governor of Idaho (b. 1931)
  • Thomas Docking , lawyer and politician (b. 1954)
  • Charles Robertson , politician (b. 1934)
  • Jay Thomas , actor and talk radio host (b. 1948)
  • Margaret Moser , journalist and music critic (b. 1954)
  • Rich Piana , bodybuilder (b. 1971)
  • Tobe Hooper , film director, screenwriter and producer (b. 1943)
  • Howard Kaminsky , publisher, novelist, and film producer (b. 1940)
  • Bernard Pomerance , playwright and poet (b. 1940)
  • Lacey E. Putney , politician (b. 1928)
  • James Dickson Phillips Jr. , federal judge (b. 1922)
  • Syd Silverman , magazine publisher (b. 1932)
  • Bobby Boyd , football player (b. 1937)
  • Jud Heathcote , basketball coach (b. 1927)
  • David Torrence , Peruvian-American runner (b. 1985)
  • August 29 – Larry Elgart , jazz saxophonist and bandleader (b. 1922)
  • Peter Diamondstone , lawyer and politician (b. 1934)
  • Louise Hay , motivational author and publisher (b. 1926)
  • Rollie Massimino , basketball player and coach (b. 1934)
  • Tim Mickelson , rower and Olympic silver medalist (b. 1948)
  • Richard Anderson , actor (b. 1926)
  • William Beik , historian (b. 1941)
  • Novella Nelson , actress and singer (b. 1938)

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • Shelley Berman , comedian, actor and writer (b. 1925)
  • Jackie Burkett , football player (b. 1936)
  • Bud George , politician (b. 1927)
  • Paul Moreno , politician (b. 1931)
  • Paul Schaal , baseball player (b. 1943)
  • Halim El-Dabh , Egyptian-born composer, musician, and ethnomusicologist (b. 1921)
  • Elizabeth Kemp , actress (b. 1951)
  • Murray Lerner , documentary filmmaker (b. 1927)
  • Michael Simanowitz , politician (b. 1971)
  • Lucky Varela , politician (b. 1935)
  • Drew Wahlroos , football player (b. 1980)
  • John Ashbery , poet (b. 1927)
  • Walter Becker , jazz-rock musician, songwriter, and record producer (b. 1950)
  • John Byrne Cooke , bluegrass musician, novelist, and photographer (b. 1940)
  • Dave Hlubek , rock guitarist and songwriter (b. 1951)
  • John P. White , government official (b. 1937)
  • Bob Kehoe , soccer player and coach (b. 1928)
  • John Wilson Lewis , political scientist and sinologist (b. 1930)
  • Harry Meshel , politician (b. 1924)
  • Nicolaas Bloembergen , Dutch-born physicist (b. 1920)
  • Gina Mason , politician (b. 1960)
  • Gin D. Wong , Chinese-born architect (b. 1922)
  • Tom Wright , baseball player (b. 1923)
  • Daniel Federman , medical educator (b. 1928)
  • Walter Guralnick , dentist and centenarian (b. 1916)
  • Jim McDaniels , basketball player (b. 1948)
  • Kate Millett , feminist writer, activist, and artist (b. 1934)
  • Lotfi A. Zadeh , Azerbaijani-born mathematician (b. 1921)
  • Jeremiah Goodman , painter and illustrator (b. 1922)
  • Mark P. Mahon , politician (b. 1930)
  • Gene Michael , baseball player, manager, and executive (b. 1938)
  • Charles Owens , football player and golfer (b. 1932)
  • Isabelle Daniels , sprinter and Olympic bronze medalist (b. 1937)
  • A. Joseph DeNucci , boxer and politician (b. 1939)
  • Blake Heron , actor (b. 1982)
  • Daniel McNeill , politician (b. 1947)
  • Jerry Pournelle , science fiction writer and journalist (b. 1933)
  • Don Williams , country singer, musician, and songwriter (b. 1939)
  • Jim Donohue , baseball player (b. 1937)
  • Michael Friedman , composer and lyricist (b. 1975)
  • Oscar E. Huber , politician (b. 1917)
  • Xavier Atencio , animator and Disney imagineer (b. 1919)
  • Nancy Dupree , historian (b. 1927)
  • Don Ohlmeyer , television producer and network executive (b. 1945)
  • Len Wein , comics writer and editor (b. 1948)
  • Mel Didier , baseball scout (b. 1927)
  • Mark LaMura , actor (b. 1948)
  • Charles F. Knight , business executive (b. 1939)
  • Gary I. Wadler , internist and sports physician (b. 1939)
  • Edith Windsor , LGBT rights activist (b. 1929)
  • Pete Domenici , politician; U.S. Senator from New Mexico (1973–2009) (b. 1932)
  • Gary Otte , convicted murderer (b. 1971)
  • Frank Vincent , actor (b. 1937)
  • George Englund , film producer, director, editor, and screenwriter (b. 1926)
  • Basil Gogos , illustrator (b. 1939)
  • Grant Hart , rock musician and songwriter (b. 1961)
  • Tommy Irvin , politician (b. 1929)
  • Herbert W. Kalmbach , attorney and banker (b. 1921)
  • Myrna Lamb , playwright (b. 1930)
  • Harry Dean Stanton , actor and singer (b. 1926)
  • Penny Chenery , racehorse owner and breeder (b. 1922)
  • Ted Christopher , racing driver (b. 1958)
  • Ben Dorcy , roadie (b. 1925)
  • Mitchell Flint , lawyer and World War II aviator (b. 1923)
  • Brenda Lewis , operatic soprano and actress (b. 1921)
  • Nabeel Qureshi , Christian apologist (b. 1983)
  • Bucky Scribner , football player (b. 1960)
  • Bonnie Angelo , journalist (b. 1924)
  • William F. Goodling , politician; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania (1975–2001) (b. 1927)
  • Bobby Heenan , professional wrestler, manager, and commentator (b. 1944)
  • Dave Hilton , baseball player (b. 1950)
  • Lucy Ozarin , psychiatrist (b. 1914)
  • Ronald E. Carrier , university president (b. 1932)
  • Paul E. Gray , electrical engineer and university president (b. 1932)
  • Paul Horner , writer and humorist (b. 1978)
  • Mark Selby , rock musician, singer, songwriter, and record producer (b. 1961)
  • Pete Turner , photographer (b. 1934)
  • Bernie Casey , football player and actor (b. 1939)
  • Jake LaMotta , boxer and comedian (b. 1922)
  • Johnny Sandlin , record producer and engineer (b. 1945)
  • William J. Ely , U.S. Army general (b. 1911)
  • Mickey Harrington , baseball player (b. 1934)
  • Garry Hill , baseball pitcher (b. 1946)
  • Ed Phillips , baseball pitcher (b. 1944)
  • Lillian Ross , journalist and author (b. 1918)
  • September 21 – Larry J. McKinney , federal judge (b. 1944)
  • Rick Shaw , radio and television personality (b. 1938)
  • Daniel Yankelovich , social scientist (b. 1924)
  • Charles Bradley , funk and soul singer (b. 1948)
  • Dorothy Eck , politician (b. 1924)
  • Seth Firkins , audio engineer (b. 1981)
  • Elizabeth D. Phillips , university administrator (b. 1945)
  • Samuel H. Young , politician; U.S. Representative from Illinois (1973–1975) (b. 1922)
  • Barbara Blaine , anti-pedophile activist (b. 1956)
  • Norman Dyhrenfurth , Swiss-born mountain climber (b. 1918)
  • Albert Innaurato , playwright (b. 1947)
  • Orville Lynn Majors , nurse and serial killer (b. 1961)
  • Joseph M. McDade , politician; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania (1963–1999) (b. 1931)
  • Robert J. McFarlin , politician (b. 1929)
  • Kit Reed , author (b. 1932)
  • Joe Bailon , vehicle customized (b. 1923)
  • Nora Marks Dauenhauer , Tlingit author, poet, and scholar (b. 1927)
  • Grant H. Palmer , educator and critic of Mormonism (b. 1940)
  • Clarence Purfeerst , politician (b. 1928)
  • Joe Schaffer , football player (b. 1937)
  • Jim Walrod , interior design consultant (b. 1961)
  • Elaine Hoffman Watts , klezmer drummer (b. 1932)
  • Donnie Corker , transvestite entertainer (b. 1951)
  • Barry Dennen , actor (b. 1938)
  • Alfred Stepan , political scientist (b. 1936)
  • CeDell Davis , blues singer and musician (b. 1926)
  • Hugh Hefner , magazine publisher, socialite, and activist (b. 1926) [298]
  • Anne Jeffreys , actress and singer (b. 1923)
  • Red Miller , football coach (b. 1927)
  • Stanley M. Rumbough Jr. , businessman, socialite, and philanthropist (b. 1920)
  • Monty Hall , Canadian-American game show host (b. 1921)
  • Frank Hamblen , basketball player and coach (b. 1947)
  • Donald Malarkey , U.S. Army soldier of World War II (b. 1921)
  • Tom Paley , folk musician (b. 1928)
  • Lou Reda , documentary filmmaker (b. 1925)
  • Joe Tiller , football player and coach (b. 1942)
  • Vladimir Voevodsky , Russian-American mathematician (b. 1966)

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • Robert D. Hales , Mormon religious leader (b. 1932)
  • Arthur Janov , psychologist and psychotherapist (b. 1927)
  • Samuel Irving Newhouse Jr. , publisher, billionaire, art collector, and philanthropist (b. 1927)
  • Dave Strader , sportscaster (b. 1955)
  • Solly Hemus , baseball player, coach, and manager (b. 1923)
  • Simon Ostrach , academic scientist and engineer (b. 1923)
  • Paul Otellini , business executive (b. 1950)
  • Jim Patterson , politician (b. 1950)
  • Tom Petty , rock musician, singer, songwriter, and record producer (b. 1950)
  • Barbara Tisserat , lithographer (b. 1951)
  • Robert Yates , NASCAR team owner (b. 1948)
  • Bob Gannon , politician (b. 1959)
  • John Herrnstein , baseball and football player (b. 1938)
  • Ninja Jorgensen , Olympic volleyball player (b. 1940)
  • Lance Russell , professional wrestling announcer (b. 1926)
  • Rufus Hannah , homeless rights advocate (b. 1954)
  • John Miller , politician; U.S. Representative from Washington (1985–1993) (b. 1938)
  • Jerry Ross , songwriter and record producer (b. 1933)
  • October 5 – Nora Johnson , author (b. 1933)
  • Connie Hawkins , basketball player (b. 1942)
  • Ralphie May , comedian (b. 1972)
  • Dick Roeding , politician (b. 1930)
  • Bunny Sigler , songwriter and record producer (b. 1941)
  • Judy Stone , journalist and film critic (b. 1924)
  • October 7 – Jim Landis , baseball player (b. 1934)
  • Edna Dummerth , baseball player (b. 1924)
  • Jerry Kleczka , politician; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin (1984–2005) (b. 1943)
  • Don Lock , baseball player (b. 1936)
  • Grady Tate , jazz drummer and vocalist (b. 1932)
  • Y. A. Tittle , football player (b. 1926)
  • ElizaBeth Gilligan , fantasy writer (b. 1962)
  • Dale Hagerman , pharmacist and businessman (b. 1927)
  • Roy Hawes , baseball player (b. 1926)
  • Ben Hawkins , football player (b. 1944)
  • Vincent La Selva , conductor (b. 1929)
  • Bill Puterbaugh , racing driver (b. 1936)
  • David Chapman , handball player (b. 1975)
  • Charles E. Gibson Jr. , lawyer (b. 1925)
  • Bob Schiller , television writer (b. 1918)
  • Don Pedro Colley , actor (b. 1938)
  • James R. Ford , educator, business executive, and politician (b. 1925)
  • Paul Hufnagle , politician (b. 1936)
  • Betty Moczynski , baseball player (b. 1926)
  • Ed Long , politician (b. 1934)
  • Robert Lynn Pruett , convicted murderer (b. 1979)
  • October 13 – William Lombardy , chess grandmaster and Roman Catholic priest (b. 1937)
  • Inside Information , Thoroughbred racehorse (b. 1991)
  • Marian Cannon Schlesinger , painter, author, and centenarian (b. 1912)
  • Daniel Webb , baseball pitcher (b. 1989)
  • Richard Wilbur , poet (b. 1921)
  • Dave Bry , music journalist and editor (b. 1970)
  • Burrhead Jones , professional wrestler (b. 1937)
  • John Andreason , politician (b. 1929)
  • Ed Barnowski , baseball pitcher (b. 1943)
  • Mychael Knight , fashion designer (b. 1978)
  • Michele Marsh , television journalist (b. 1954)
  • Julian May , science fiction, fantasy, and horror writer (b. 1931)
  • Dick Morley , engineer and inventor (b. 1932)
  • Brent Briscoe , actor and screenwriter (b. 1961)
  • Helen DeVos , philanthropist (b. 1927)
  • Stan Kowalski , professional wrestler (b. 1926)
  • Justin Reed , basketball player (b. 1982)
  • Al Hurricane , singer-songwriter and guitarist (b. 1936)
  • Scott Putesky , heavy metal guitarist (b. 1968)
  • Chuck Weber , football player (b. 1930)
  • Michael Patrick Driscoll , Roman Catholic prelate (b. 1939)
  • Paul J. Weitz , aviator and astronaut (b. 1932)
  • Robert Guillaume , actor (b. 1927)
  • Fats Domino , pianist and singer-songwriter (b. 1928)
  • October 25 – Jack Bannon , American actor (b. (1940)
  • Shea Norman , gospel singer (b. 1971)
  • Stephen Toulouse , policy specialist and public relations manager (b. 1972)
  • October 27 – Joe Taub , businessman, philanthropist and sports owner (b. (1929)
  • October 28 – Ronald Getoor , mathematician (b. 1929)
  • Muhal Richard Abrams , jazz pianist (b. 1930)
  • Dennis Banks , activist and actor (b. 1937)
  • Richard E. Cavazos , army general (b. 1929)
  • October 30 – Judy Martz , politician, 22nd Governor of Montana (b. 1943)
  • October 31 – Red Murrell , basketball player (b. 1933)

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • Brad Bufanda , actor (b. 1983)
  • Katie Lee , folk singer, writer, photographer, and environmental activist (b. 1919)
  • John Mecray , realist painter (b. 1937)
  • Richard P. Mills , educator (b. 1944)
  • Paul V. Mullaney , politician and judge (b. 1919)
  • Myron Noodleman , clown (b. 1958)
  • James Tayoun , politician (b. 1930)
  • John Paul De Cecco , LGBT writer and academic (b. 1925)
  • Orval H. Hansen , politician; U.S. Representative from Idaho (1969–1975) (b. 1926)
  • William Landau , neurologist (b. 1924)
  • Joan Tisch , billionaire heiress, socialite, and philanthropist (b. 1927)
  • Bill Wilkerson , radio personality and sportscaster (b. 1945)
  • Sid Catlett , basketball player (b. 1948)
  • Ed Flanagan , politician (b. 1950)
  • C. W. Smith , racing driver and police officer (b. 1947)
  • Anna Diggs Taylor , federal judge (b. 1932)
  • Gene Verble , baseball player and manager (b. 1928)
  • Don Eddy , basketball coach (b. 1935)
  • Nancy Friday , author (b. 1933) [299]
  • Robert Knight , R&B singer (b. 1945)
  • Louis Roney , operatic tenor (b. 1921)
  • Vera Shlakman , economist and academic (b. 1909)
  • George Edward Tait , poet and activist (b. 1943)
  • Dave Cloutier , football player (b. 1938)
  • Joe Fortunato , football player (b. 1930)
  • Richard F. Gordon Jr. , aviator, chemist, and astronaut (b. 1929)
  • Rhona Silver , businesswoman (b. 1951)
  • Rick Stelmaszek , baseball player and coach (b. 1948)
  • Debra Chasnoff , documentary filmmaker (b. 1957)
  • Robert De Cormier , music conductor and arranger (b. 1922)
  • Wendell Eugene , jazz trombonist (b. 1923)
  • Roy Halladay , baseball player (b. 1977)
  • Brad Harris , actor and stunt performer (b. 1933)
  • Loren Hightower , dancer and choreographer (b. 1927)
  • Dolores Kendrick , poet (b. 1927)
  • John H. Cushman , U.S. Army general (b. 1921)
  • Wood Moy , actor (b. 1918)
  • Don Prince , baseball player (b. 1938)
  • Donald S. Coffey , physician and educator (b. 1932)
  • Fred Cole , rock singer, songwriter, and guitarist (b. 1948)
  • Robert Gensburg , lawyer (b. 1939)
  • John Hillerman , actor (b. 1932) [300]
  • Gene Kotlarek , Olympic ski jumper (b. 1940)
  • Chuck Mosley , rock singer, songwriter, and guitarist (b. 1959)
  • Chuck Nergard , politician (b. 1929)
  • Jim Sladky , ice dancer (b. 1947)
  • Vanu Bose , electrical engineer and technology executive (b. 1965)
  • Frank Corsaro , theatre and opera director and actor (b. 1924)
  • Gemze de Lappe , ballerina and choreographer (b. 1922)
  • Edward S. Herman , journalist and activist (b. 1925)
  • Nate Hobgood-Chittick , football player (b. 1974)
  • Rance Pless , baseball player (b. 1925)
  • Jeffrey T. Richelson , author and researcher (b. 1949)
  • Bobby Baker , political adviser (b. 1928)
  • Tom Cornsweet , psychologist and inventor (b. 1929)
  • Wendy Pepper , fashion designer (b. 1964)
  • John C. Raines , educator and activist (b. 1933)
  • Eric Salzman , composer, music critic, and record producer (b. 1933)
  • Edith Savage-Jennings , civil rights activist (b. 1924)
  • Liz Smith , journalist and gossip columnist (b. 1923) [301]
  • Lawrence R. Yetka , judge (b. 1924)
  • Jeff Capel II , basketball coach (b. 1953)
  • Bobby Doerr , baseball player and coach (b. 1918) [302]
  • Thomas J. Hudner Jr. , naval aviator (b. 1924)
  • Janet Paula Lupo , model (b. 1950)
  • Haskell Monroe , educator and university administrator (b. 1931)
  • Jim Rivera , baseball player (b. 1921)
  • Albert C. Ledner , architect (b. 1924)
  • Nancy Zieman , sewing instructor, writer, and television host (b. 1953)
  • Michelle Boisseau , poet (b. 1955) [303]
  • David S. Cunningham Jr. , business executive and politician (b. 1935)
  • Robert G. Jahn , physicist and parapsychologist (b. 1930)
  • Lil Peep , rapper and singer (b. 1996)
  • J. Steve Mostyn , lawyer (b. 1971)
  • Eric P. Newman , numismatist and centenarian (b. 1911)
  • Jaroslav Vanek , Czech-born economist (b. 1930)
  • John Gambino , Italian-born mobster (b. 1940)
  • William Mayer , composer (b. 1925)
  • Ferdie Pacheco , physician, boxing trainer and commentator (b. 1927)
  • Kenneth Ryskamp , federal judge (b. 1932)
  • Jack Stauffacher , typographer and publisher (b. 1920)
  • Greg Standridge , businessman and politician (b. 1967)
  • Ann Wedgeworth , actress (b. 1934)
  • J. C. Caroline , football player (b. 1933)
  • Aijalon Gomes , educator, missionary, and North Korean detainee (b. 1979)
  • Lilli Hornig , Czech-born scientist and feminist (b. 1921)
  • Earle Hyman , actor (b. 1926) [304]
  • Ulrich Petersen , Peruvian-born geologist (b. 1927)
  • Robert D. Raiford , radio broadcaster and actor (b. 1927)
  • Howard Bruner Schaffer , educator and diplomat (b. 1929)
  • Bob Borkowski , baseball player (b. 1926)
  • Flawless Sabrina , drag queen and LGBT activist (b. 1939)
  • William Hoeveler , federal judge (b. 1922)
  • Ben Riley , jazz drummer (b. 1933)
  • Ken Shapiro , child actor, television writer, and producer (b. 1942)
  • Peter Baldwin , actor, film and television director (b. 1931)
  • Charles Manson , criminal and cult leader (b. 1934)
  • Warren "Pete" Moore , R&B singer, songwriter, and record producer (b. 1938)
  • Pancho Segura , tennis player (b. 1921) [305]
  • Della Reese , jazz and gospel singer, actress, and ordained minister (b. 1931) [306]
  • Mel Tillis , country music singer and songwriter (b. 1932) [307]
  • Eugene Domack , geologist (b. 1956)
  • Terry Glenn , football player (b. 1974) [308]
  • Ernestine Petras , baseball player (b. 1924)
  • David Cassidy , actor and pop singer (b. 1950)
  • Wayne Cochran , soul singer, songwriter, and record producer (b. 1939)
  • Keith Muxlow , politician (b. 1933)
  • Joseph White , psychologist (b. 1932)
  • George Avakian , record producer (b. 1919)
  • Norman Baker , explorer (b. 1928)
  • John Coates Jr. , jazz pianist, composer, and arranger (b. 1938)
  • Jon Hendricks , jazz singer and songwriter (b. 1921)
  • Maurice Hinchey , politician (b. 1938)
  • Tommy Keene , rock singer and songwriter (b. 1958)
  • Charles C. McDonald , U.S. Air Force general (b. 1933)
  • Bobbie L. Sterne , politician (b. 1919)
  • Edward C. Taylor , chemist (b. 1923)
  • Carol Neblett , operatic soprano (b. 1946)
  • Craig Tieszen , politician (b. 1949)
  • Wesley L. Fox , U.S. Marine Corps officer and military writer (b. 1931)
  • Neil Gillman , Canadian-born rabbi and theologian (b. 1933)
  • Stephen Knapp , art photographer (b. 1947)
  • Lowen Kruse , politician (b. 1929)
  • Mitch Margo , doo-wop singer and songwriter (b. 1947)
  • John Thierry , football player (b. 1971)
  • John Black , politician (b. 1933)
  • Bertha Calloway , museum director and activist (b. 1925)
  • Edward Fudge , lawyer and Christian theologian (b. 1944)
  • Ken Gray , football player (b. 1936)
  • Rance Howard , actor (b. 1928)
  • Steve "Snapper" Jones , basketball player and broadcaster (b. 1942)
  • John M. Lewellen , politician (b. 1930)
  • Bogdan Maglich , Serbian-born nuclear physicist (b. 1928)
  • Julio Oscar Mechoso , actor (b. 1955)
  • Harry Pregerson , federal judge (b. 1923)
  • Ruth Bancroft , gardener, landscape architect and centenarian (b. 1908)
  • Garnett Thomas Eisele , federal judge (b. 1923)
  • Georg Iggers , German-born historian (b. 1926)
  • Peggy Vining , poet (b. 1929)
  • W. Marvin Watson , university president and presidential advisor (b. 1924)
  • Bill Harris , politician (b. 1934)
  • Bud Moore , racing driver and NASCAR owner (b. 1925)
  • Robert Popwell , rock and jazz bassist (b. 1950)
  • Warren Spannaus , politician (b. 1930)
  • Joseph N. Crowley , university president and cannabis activist (b. 1933)
  • Fritz Graf , National Football League official (b. 1922)
  • Don Moore , politician (b. 1928)
  • Jerry Fodor , philosopher and cognitive scientist (b. 1935)
  • Fran Hopper , comics artist (b. 1922)
  • Charles E. Merrill Jr. , educator and philanthropist (b. 1920)
  • Robert Walker , blues guitarist (b. 1937)
  • Dick Gernert , baseball player, coach, and manager (b. 1928)
  • Gary Ingram , politician (b. 1933)
  • Jim Nabors , actor and singer (b. 1930)
  • Vincent Scully , architectural historian (b. 1920)

2017 Yeni lez porno

  • Arif Dirlik , Turkish-born historian (b. 1940)
  • Perry Wallace , basketball player and legal scholar (b. 1948)
  • Les Whitten , journalist and novelist (b. 1928)
  • Mundell Lowe , jazz guitarist (b. 1922)
  • Marianne Means , political columnist and White House correspondent (b. 1934) [309]
  • John B. Anderson , politician; U.S. Representative from Illinois (1961–1981) (b. 1922)
  • Ernest A. Finney Jr. , judge; South Carolina Supreme Court justice (b. 1931)
  • Leandro Rizzuto , billionaire businessman (b. 1938)
  • Mary Louise Hancock , politician (b. 1920)
  • Alexander Harvey II , federal judge (b. 1923)
  • Rudolph G. Wilson , storyteller, writer, and academic (b. 1935)
  • Edward Zemprelli , politician (b. 1925)
  • Maurice Green , virologist (b. 1926)
  • Ron Meyer , football coach (b. 1941)
  • Conrad Brooks , actor (b. 1931)
  • Charles J. Cella , businessman and race horse owner (b. 1936)
  • William H. Gass , author and educator (b. 1924)
  • Kathleen Karr , author (b. 1946)
  • George E. Killian , basketball coach and administrator (b. 1924)
  • Tracy Stallard , baseball pitcher (b. 1937)
  • Cy Young , Olympic javelin thrower (b. 1928)
  • MacDonald Becket , architect (b. 1928)
  • Fred J. Doocy , politician and banker (b. 1913)
  • Morton Estrin , classical pianist (b. 1923)
  • Sunny Murray , jazz drummer (b. 1936)
  • Steve Reevis , actor (b. 1962)
  • Roland Taylor , basketball player (b. 1946)
  • James P. Cullen , U.S. Army general (b. 1945)
  • Howard Gottfried , film producer (b. 1923)
  • Tubby Raymond , football and baseball player and coach (b. 1926)
  • Gloria Ann Taylor , soul singer (b. 1944)
  • Morris Zelditch , sociologist (b. 1928)
  • James Joseph Brady , lawyer and judge (b. 1944)
  • Allen C. Kelley , economist (b. 1937)
  • Marshall Loeb , business journalist and editor (b. 1929)
  • Joe Newton , track and field coach (b. 1929)
  • Tony Sumpter , football player (b. 1922)
  • Tom Zenk , professional wrestler and bodybuilder (b. 1958)
  • Angry Grandpa , Internet personality (b. 1950)
  • Simeon Booker , journalist (b. 1918)
  • Bruce Brown , documentary filmmaker (b. 1937)
  • Curtis W. Harris , minister, civil rights activist, and politician (b. 1924)
  • Ronald W. Hodges , entomologist and lepidopterist (b. 1934)
  • Ray Kassar , business executive (b. 1928)
  • Harold Levine , mathematician
  • Roy Reed , journalist (b. 1930)
  • Paul T. Fader , lawyer and politician (b. 1959)
  • Charles Robert Jenkins , U.S. Army soldier and defector to North Korea (b. 1940)
  • Vera Katz , politician (b. 1933)
  • John P. Yates , politician (b. 1921)
  • Ken Bracey , baseball pitcher, manager, and scout (b. 1937)
  • Michael Clendenin , journalist (b. 1934)
  • Pat DiNizio , rock singer, songwriter, and guitarist (b. 1955)
  • Marvin Greenberg , mathematician (b. 1935)
  • Ed Lee , politician; 43rd Mayor of San Francisco (b. 1952)
  • Lewis Manilow , attorney, real estate developer, and philanthropist (b. 1927)
  • Willie Pickens , jazz pianist and composer (b. 1931)
  • Anthony Scaduto , journalist and biographer (b. 1932)
  • Warrel Dane , heavy metal singer and songwriter (b. 1961)
  • John DeLamater , sociologist and sexologist (b. 1940)
  • Bette Howland , author and critic (b. 1937)
  • Bill Hudson , football player (b. 1935)
  • Dan Johnson , politician and minister (b. 1960)
  • Frank Lary , baseball pitcher (b. 1930)
  • Tommy Nobis , football player (b. 1943)
  • Martin Ransohoff , film and television producer (b. 1927)
  • Paul Yesawich , basketball player (b. 1923)
  • Bob Givens , animator (b. 1918)
  • Charles Byron Renfrew , federal judge (b. 1928)
  • R. C. Sproul , Christian pastor and theologian (b. 1939)
  • Marilyn Ware , businesswoman and diplomat (b. 1943)
  • Lones Wigger , Olympic shooter (b. 1937)
  • Arthur S. Abramson , linguist (b. 1925)
  • Don Hogan Charles , photographer (b. 1938)
  • Pierre Hohenberg , French-American theoretical physicist (b. 1934)
  • Ralph Carney , rock singer, songwriter, and musician (b. 1956)
  • Len Ceglarski , ice hockey player and coach (b. 1926)
  • Richard Dobson , country singer and songwriter (b. 1942)
  • E. Hunter Harrison , railway executive (b. 1944)
  • Keely Smith , jazz singer (b. 1928)
  • Robert G. Wilmers , billionaire banker (b. 1934)
  • Johnny Fox , magician and stunt performer (b. 1953)
  • Doug Gallagher , baseball pitcher (b. 1940)
  • Bob Glidden , dragster driver (b. 1944)
  • Al Kelley , golfer (b. 1935)
  • Kevin Mahogany , jazz singer (b. 1958)
  • Bennett Malone , politician (b. 1944)
  • Edward Rowny , U.S. Army general and centenarian (b. 1917)
  • Janet Benshoof , lawyer and reproductive rights activist (b. 1947)
  • William O. Harbach , television producer and director (b. 1919)
  • Larry Harris , music executive (b. 1947)
  • LeRoy Jolley , horse trainer (b. 1937)
  • Clifford Irving , novelist, investigative reporter, and convicted fraudster (b. 1930)
  • Mamie Johnson , baseball pitcher (b. 1935)
  • Ruth McClendon , politician (b. 1943)
  • Jerry A. Moore Jr. , Baptist minister and politician (b. 1918)
  • Frank North , football coach (b. 1924)
  • Richard Venture , actor (b. 1923)
  • Leo Welch , blues singer and musician (b. 1932)
  • William Agee , business executive (b. 1938)
  • Carolyn Cohen , biologist and biophysicist (b. 1929)
  • Combat Jack , lawyer, hip-hop record producer, writer, and podcaster (b. 1964)
  • Charlie Hennigan , football player (b. 1935)
  • Bernard Francis Law , Roman Catholic prelate and civil rights activist (b. 1931)
  • George Mans , football player and coach and politician (b. 1940)
  • Diane Straus , magazine publisher (b. 1951)
  • Marilyn Tyler , operatic soprano (b. 1926)
  • Dick Enberg , sportscaster (b. 1935)
  • March Fong Eu , Chinese-American politician (b. 1922)
  • Jim French , radio host and voice actor (b. 1928)
  • Dominic Frontiere , jazz accordionist, composer, and arranger (b. 1931)
  • D. Bruce MacPherson , Episcopal prelate (b. 1940)
  • Bruce McCandless II , aviator, electrical engineer, and astronaut (b. 1937)
  • Roswell Rudd , jazz trombonist (b. 1935)
  • Jerry Yellin , U.S. Army Air Forces fighter pilot (b. 1924)
  • Lou Adler , radio journalist (b. 1929)
  • Pervis Atkins , football player (b. 1935)
  • Hal Bedsole , football player (b. 1941)
  • Viola Davis Brown , nurse and nursing administrator (b. 1930)
  • Domenic Cretara , painter (b. 1946)
  • Joseph F. Timilty , politician (b. 1938)
  • Erica Garner , civil rights activist (b. 1990 ) [310]

See also [ edit ]

  • 2017 in American music
  • 2017 in American soccer
  • 2017 in American television
  • List of American films of 2017

References [ edit ]

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  • ^ "Officials: More than 100 hurt in LIRR train derailment" . Newsday . January 4, 2017 . Retrieved January 4, 2017 .
  • ^ McLaughlin, Aidan. "LIRR train derails, injuring 103 people in Brooklyn at Atlantic Terminal" . New York Daily News . Retrieved January 4, 2017 .
  • ^ Witze, Alexandra (January 4, 2017). "NASA sets sights on asteroid exploration" . Nature . Nature Publishing Group . doi : 10.1038/nature.2016.21234 . S2CID   132998003 . Archived from the original on January 5, 2017 . Retrieved January 5, 2017 .
  • ^ "Declassified report: Putin ordered election interference to help Trump" . The Hill . January 6, 2017 . Retrieved January 10, 2017 .
  • ^ "US election hacking: Putin 'sought to help' Trump" . BBC News . January 7, 2017 . Retrieved January 10, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump to order anti-hacking plan within 90 days of taking office: statement" . Reuters. January 6, 2017 . Retrieved January 10, 2017 .
  • ^ "Esteban Santiago: Details emerge of suspect in airport shooting" . Sun-Sentinel. January 6, 2017. Archived from the original on January 20, 2017 . Retrieved January 10, 2017 .
  • ^ "U.S. Congress certifies Trump's Electoral College victory" . Reuters. January 5, 2017 . Retrieved January 10, 2017 .
  • ^ "La La Land wins record seven Golden Globes as Moonlight takes best drama" . The Guardian . January 9, 2017 . Retrieved January 10, 2017 .
  • ^ "Donald Trump calls Meryl Streep 'over-rated' after Golden Globes speech" . The Guardian . January 9, 2017 . Retrieved January 10, 2017 .
  • ^ "SeaWorld San Diego hosts final One Ocean orca show on Sunday" . BBC News . January 7, 2017 . Retrieved January 10, 2017 .
  • ^ "Dylann Roof sentenced to death for killing 9 church members" . Politico. January 10, 2017 . Retrieved January 10, 2017 .
  • ^ Parsons, Christi (January 2, 2017). "President Obama confirms farewell address in Chicago" . Chicago Tribune . Retrieved January 3, 2017 .
  • ^ "Highlights from Donald Trump's press conference" . CBS News . January 11, 2017 . Retrieved January 11, 2017 .
  • ^ "Intel chiefs presented Trump with claims of Russian efforts to compromise him" . CNN. January 10, 2017 . Retrieved January 11, 2017 .
  • ^ "The story of the Trump dossier: secret sources, an airport rendezvous, and John McCain" . TheGuardian.com . January 11, 2017 . Retrieved January 11, 2017 .
  • ^ "US watchdog to probe FBI Clinton email actions" . BBC News . January 12, 2017 . Retrieved January 13, 2017 .
  • ^ "US tanks and troops in Poland a threat, Russia says" . BBC News . January 12, 2017 . Retrieved January 13, 2017 .
  • ^ "Judge: Exxon Mobil must give documents to attorney general" . Associated Press. January 12, 2017 . Retrieved January 13, 2017 .
  • ^ "Chicago Police Routinely Trampled on Civil Rights, Justice Dept. Says" . The New York Times . January 13, 2017 . Retrieved January 13, 2017 .
  • ^ "SpaceX returns to flight with Falcon 9 rocket launch" . BBC News . January 14, 2017 . Retrieved January 16, 2017 .
  • ^ "Obama commutes Chelsea Manning sentence" . BBC News . January 17, 2017 . Retrieved January 17, 2017 .
  • ^ "El Chapo, Mexican Drug Kingpin, Is Extradited to the U.S." The New York Times . January 19, 2017 . Retrieved January 19, 2017 .
  • ^ "Obama commutes 330 sentences, most in a single day" . CNN. January 20, 2017 . Retrieved January 25, 2017 .
  • ^ Murse, Tom. "Obama's Last Day as President: When Barack Obama's Second Term Ends" . about.com . Retrieved June 10, 2016 .
  • ^ "Women's March Is The Biggest Protest In US History As An Estimated 2.9 Million March" . Politicus USA. January 21, 2017 . Retrieved January 22, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal withdrawal Trump's first executive action on Monday" . CNN. January 24, 2017 . Retrieved January 25, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump issues executive order freezing hiring for federal workforce" . Politico . January 23, 2017 . Retrieved January 25, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump Revives Keystone Pipeline Rejected by Obama" . The New York Times . January 24, 2017 . Retrieved January 25, 2017 .
  • ^ "EPA goes silent under Trump, report says" . Business Insider . January 24, 2017 . Retrieved January 25, 2017 .
  • ^ "EPA: White House Freezes Social Media Temporarily" . Time . January 24, 2017. Archived from the original on January 24, 2017 . Retrieved January 25, 2017 .
  • ^ "Oscar Nominations 2017: 14 for 'La La Land', 6 for Black Actors" . The New York Times . January 24, 2017 . Retrieved January 25, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump signs orders on border wall, immigration crackdown" . Politico. January 25, 2017 . Retrieved January 25, 2017 .
  • ^ "Dow cracks 20,000 for the first time ever" . Market Watch. January 25, 2017 . Retrieved January 25, 2017 .
  • ^ "How Author Timothy Tyson Found the Woman at the Center of the Emmett Till Case" . Vanity Fair . January 26, 2017 . Retrieved January 28, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump's refugee and travel suspension: world reacts" . BBC News . January 28, 2017 . Retrieved January 28, 2017 .
  • ^ "ACLU sues White House over immigration ban" . The Hill . January 28, 2017 . Retrieved January 28, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump's Order Blocks Immigrants at Airports, Stoking Fear Around Globe" . The New York Times . January 28, 2017 . Retrieved January 28, 2017 .
  • ^ "Iran to ban US citizens in response to Trump's immigration order" . CNN. January 28, 2017 . Retrieved January 28, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump Fires Acting Attorney General Who Defied Him" . The New York Times . January 30, 2017 . Retrieved February 3, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump picks Colo. appeals court judge Neil Gorsuch for Supreme Court" . The Washington Post . January 31, 2017 . Retrieved February 3, 2017 .
  • ^ "DHS watchdog to investigate rollout of Trump's immigration order" . The Hill . February 2, 2017 . Retrieved February 3, 2017 .
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  • ^ "Charles Manson dies aged 83 after four decades in prison" . BBC News . November 20, 2017 . Retrieved November 20, 2017 .
  • ^ "Dominant season turns into emotional championship for Truex, Furniture Row" . November 19, 2017.
  • ^ "Eric Trump funneled cancer charity money to his business: Report" . ABC . November 20, 2017 . Retrieved November 21, 2017 .
  • ^ "Charlie Rose: CBS sacks talk show host over harassment claims" . BBC News . November 21, 2017 . Retrieved November 21, 2017 .
  • ^ "Matt Lauer: NBC sacks star Today Show host over sex allegation" . BBC News . November 29, 2017 . Retrieved November 29, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump Twitter account retweets incendiary videos" . BBC News . November 29, 2017 . Retrieved November 29, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry" . The New York Times . November 30, 2017 . Retrieved December 1, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump-Russia: Flynn charged with 'making false statement' " . BBC News . December 1, 2017 . Retrieved December 1, 2017 .
  • ^ "Tax bill: Trump victory as Senate backs tax overhaul" . BBC News . December 2, 2017 . Retrieved December 2, 2017 .
  • ^ "Senate Republicans pass sweeping overhaul of US tax code" . The Guardian . December 2, 2017 . Retrieved December 2, 2017 .
  • ^ "Emails Dispute White House Claims That Flynn Acted Independently on Russia" . The New York Times . December 2, 2017 . Retrieved December 3, 2017 .
  • ^ "Trump shrinks Utah monuments angering environmentalists" . BBC News . December 4, 2017 . Retrieved December 4, 2017 .
  • ^ "Supreme court backs Trump travel ban" . BBC News . December 4, 2017 . Retrieved December 4, 2017 .
  • ^ "Jerusalem is Israel's capital – Trump" . BBC News . December 6, 2017 . Retrieved December 6, 2017 .
  • ^ "California wildfires: Businesses face ruin as blaze rages" . BBC News . December 9, 2017 . Retrieved December 9, 2017 .
  • ^ "New York explosion at Manhattan bus terminal" . BBC News . December 11, 2017 . Retrieved December 11, 2017 .
  • ^ "Alabama election: Democrats defeat Roy Moore, dealing huge blow to Donald Trump" . The Guardian . December 13, 2017 . Retrieved December 13, 2017 .
  • ^ "US Federal Reserve raises interest rates again" . BBC News . December 13, 2017 . Retrieved December 13, 2017 .
  • ^ "The Walt Disney Company To Acquire Twenty-First Century Fox, Inc., After Spinoff Of Certain Businesses, For $52.4 Billion In Stock" . Walt Disney . December 14, 2017 . Retrieved December 14, 2017 .
  • ^ "F.C.C. Repeals Net Neutrality Rules" . The New York Times . December 14, 2017 . Retrieved December 14, 2017 .
  • ^ "CDC gets list of forbidden words: fetus, transgender, diversity" . The Washington Post . December 15, 2017 . Retrieved December 16, 2017 .
  • ^ Cooper, Helene; Blumenthal, Ralph; Kean, Lesie (December 16, 2017). "Glowing Auras and 'Black Money': The Pentagon's Mysterious U.F.O. Program" . The New York Times . Retrieved December 16, 2017 .
  • ^ Siese, April (December 16, 2017). "The Pentagon has confirmed its $22M program to investigate UFOs" . Quartz (publication) . Retrieved December 17, 2017 .
  • ^ "Donald Trump to drop climate change from list of national security threats" . The Independent . December 18, 2017. Archived from the original on May 1, 2022 . Retrieved December 18, 2017 .
  • ^ "Washington train crash: Rail carriages fall on US motorway" . BBC News . December 18, 2017 . Retrieved December 18, 2017 .
  • ^ "John Skipper resigns as ESPN president, George Bodenheimer takes over as acting chairman" . ESPN . December 18, 2017 . Retrieved December 18, 2017 .
  • ^ Stein, Rob (December 19, 2017). "First Gene Therapy For Inherited Disease Gets FDA Approval" . NPR . Retrieved December 20, 2017 .
  • ^ "FDA approves novel gene therapy to treat patients with a rare form of inherited vision loss" . FDA . December 19, 2017 . Retrieved December 20, 2017 .
  • ^ "Papa John's founder out as CEO weeks after NFL comments" . CNBC . December 21, 2017. Archived from the original on December 21, 2017 . Retrieved December 22, 2017 .
  • ^ "Opioid crisis linked to two-year drop in US life expectancy" . BBC News . December 22, 2017 . Retrieved December 23, 2017 .
  • ^ "Mortality in the United States, 2016" (PDF) . CDC . December 21, 2017 . Retrieved December 23, 2017 .
  • ^ "San Francisco: Man arrested over 'Christmas terror plan' " . BBC News . December 22, 2017 . Retrieved December 23, 2017 .
  • ^ "The Latest: Browns complete 2nd 0-16 season in NFL history" .
  • ^ "Browns finish NFL season without a win" . BBC Sport .
  • ^ "SeaWorld: Tilikum, orca that killed trainer, has died" . WFLA-TV . Associated Press. January 6, 2017 . Retrieved January 9, 2017 .
  • ^ "Nat Hentoff, journalist who wrote on jazz and civil liberties, dies at 91" . The Washington Post . January 8, 2017 . Retrieved January 9, 2017 .
  • ^ "Mary Tyler Moore obituary" . The Guardian . January 25, 2017 . Retrieved November 8, 2021 .
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  • 2017 Honda Accord

Change year or car

starting MSRP

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Base trim shown

26 combined mpg

Front-wheel drive

View all  2017 Honda Accord specs .

  • Safety ratings, technology
  • Refined drivetrains
  • Gas mileage
  • Many standard features
  • Firm ride in Sport, Touring models
  • Onerous touch-sensitive controls on some trims
  • Fewer luxury options than some competitors
  • Narrow extended cargo opening with backseat folded

Starting msrp listed lowest to highest price

Wondering which trim is right for you?

Our 2017 Honda Accord trim comparison will help you decide.

Notable features

  • Accord Hybrid returns for 2017 model year
  • Apple CarPlay, Android Auto smartphone connectivity available
  • High-tech safety features available
  • Sedan or coupe
  • Four-cylinder or V-6 engine

2017 Honda Accord review: Our expert's take

What is the 2017 honda accord.

The 2017 Honda Accord is a five-seat mid-size car that's available as a coupe or a sedan. It competes with the Toyota Camry , Nissan Altima  and Ford Fusion , among others. The 2017 Honda Accord is available in eight trim levels: LX, LX-S, Sport, Sport SE, EX, EX-L, EX-L V6 and Touring V6. The LX-S is a two-door coupe, and the EX, EX-L, EX-L V6 and the Touring V6 are available as a four-door sedan or a two-door coupe. The Accord also comes in hybrid form , which is covered separately.

What's New on the 2017 Honda Accord?

For 2017, the Accord now has a Sport Special Edition that's slotted in between the Sport and EX trim levels. It features Special Edition badges as well as heated leather seats.

What Features in the 2017 Honda Accord Are Most Important?

The 2017 Honda Accord has a standard 185-horsepower, 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine with a standard six-speed manual transmission or an available continuously variable automatic transmission. The Sport models deliver 189 hp. An optional 278-hp, 3.5-liter V-6 comes with a six-speed automatic transmission. Significant standard features include dual-zone automatic climate control, a tilt/telescoping steering wheel, cruise control and a backup camera. As required in every new vehicle, the Honda Accord comes with front airbags, antilock brakes and an electronic stability system.

Significant available features include forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, full LED headlights, a navigation system, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone connectivity, power moonroof, power front seats, heated leather seats, lane departure warning with steering assist and the LaneWatch camera system that displays adjacent traffic.

Should I Buy the 2017 Honda Accord?

Shoppers looking for a mid-size sedan or coupe will appreciate the refined drivetrains that the 2017 Honda Accord offers. You'll get good gas mileage and this car offers good visibility as well as plenty of standard features. That being said, the Sport and Touring models deliver a firm ride, and when the time comes to equip your car, there are fewer luxury options than some competitors. While passenger space is good, the cargo opening with the backseats folded is narrow, and some trim levels have arduous touch-sensitive controls.

Cars.com's Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com's long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don't accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com's advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Consumer reviews

  • Comfort 4.8
  • Interior design 4.8
  • Performance 4.8
  • Value for the money 4.8
  • Exterior styling 4.8
  • Reliability 4.9

Most recent consumer reviews

2017 accord ex-l sedan with nav and sensing suite..

I purchased my black on black 2017 Accord EX-L Sedan with Navigation and Sensing Suite in early January 2020. I came from a 2003 Civic EX Sedan which was some serious technology shock for me. After being in a horrible high speed car with a friend in his 2001 Civic LX Sedan and him dying the following it scared me. I wanted larger, heavier and modern safety features with comfort and fuel efficiency. But this is the most comfortable and nicest car that I have ever had the privilege of owning. Nit to mention for a big black sedan, Raven is just sexy.

  • Comfort 5.0
  • Interior design 5.0
  • Performance 5.0
  • Value for the money 5.0
  • Exterior styling 5.0
  • Reliability 5.0
  • Purchased a Used car
  • Used for Having fun
  • Does recommend this car

2017 Honda Accord LX-S

2017 LX-S. Last year of the 2-door coupe. Bought it brand new. Ordered it and had it made. Only took 2-3 weeks. Great car! Looks beautiful. Love the styling. Very rich looking. Turned in my end-of-lease BMW and had the Honda salesman pick me up with the LX-S at the BMW dealership. The BMW salesmen were stunned and actually asked if they could sit in it. They said, "THIS is a Honda? Wow. Nice car." Runs flawlessly. Had to replace the battery after 3 years and tires after 4 1/2 years. That's it. Comes standard with: alloy wheels, PS, PB, PW, Cruise, dual A/C control, Bluetooth, USB interface, color back up camera, 185 HP, CVT auto trans, and paddle shifters like the BMW had. Steering is tight and performance is impressive. It will run with the fastest traffic on the interstate without breathing hard. The CVT (Continuously Variable Transmission) is so smooth. No shift points. Operates flawlessly. A real pleasure to drive. Realistically averages 28-30 MPG around town on regular gas. All in all, a great car. Looks great. Runs great. Worth $20K - $23K on the used car market which is close to what I paid for it. When and if I ever sell it, it will be for another Honda Accord.

  • Purchased a New car
  • Used for Commuting

Honda Accord Sport Special Edition is a great valu

This car meets all my needs purchased it pre-owned with about 15,000 miles on it. It averages around 29-30 MPG driving from Trabuco to Newport Beach, CA. Round trip about 50 miles.

Have questions about warranties or CPO programs?

Compare the competitors

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All model years for the Honda Accord

  • 2023 Honda Accord
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  • 1992 Honda Accord

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2017 Comedy Movie Releases

Unconfirmed release dates, january 2017, february 2017, august 2017, september 2017, october 2017, november 2017, december 2017.

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Calendar for Year 2017 (United Kingdom)

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  • All Types Events Birthdays Weddings & Divorces Deaths

What Happened in 2017

  • Weddings & Divorces

Historical Events in 2017

  • Feb 17 Discovery of a new mostly underwater continent Zealandia in the South Pacific announced in research journal "GSA Today"
  • May 7 Emmanuel Macron wins France's presidential election defeating Marine Le Pen
  • Jul 4 North Korea tests first successful intercontinental ballistic missile into Sea of Japan
  • Jul 9 Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi proclaims victory over Islamic State forces in Mosul
  • Jul 20 China announces a plan against “foreign garbage” banning 24 categories of plastic and recyclable waste from 2018
  • Sep 5 Hurricane Irma becomes the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Basin region with winds of 185mph (280km/h)
  • Oct 17 Islamic State headquarters Raqqa declared under full control of US-led alliance by Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) spokesman Talal Sello after 4 months of fighting
  • Oct 25 Chinese Premier Xi Jinping unveils his new ruling council in the Great Hall of the People, none of the five are young enough to succeed him
  • Nov 21 Robert Mugabe 's resignation after 37 years in power is read out in Zimbabwe's parliaments during impeachment proceedings
  • More Events in 2017

2017 in Film & TV

  • May 7 “Baahubali 2: The Conclusion” becomes the highest grossing Indian box office film ever earning $120 million
  • Jul 16 BBC announces first ever female Doctor Who will be played by Jodie Whittaker
  • Oct 5 "The New York Times" publishes investigation into sexual harassment behaviour by Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein
  • Oct 15 Actress Alyssa Milano 's tweet “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’" prompts flood of replies across Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

2017 in Music

  • Feb 22 Jay-Z becomes 1st rapper to be inducted into Songwriters Hall of Fame alongside Max Martin, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis
  • Apr 1 Bob Dylan receives his Nobel Prize for Literature at a private ceremony in Stockholm
  • Aug 3 Camila Cabello releases her single "Havana" (biggest song worldwide 2018, 19 million copies sold)

2017 in Sport

  • Jan 28 Australian Open Women's Tennis: Serena Williams defeats older sister Venus Williams 6–4, 6–4 for her 7th Australian title and record 23rd Grand Slam event singles victory
  • Mar 14 World's oldest golf club Muirfield in Scotland, votes to admit women as members for 1st time in 273 years
  • Jun 11 French Open Men's Tennis: Spaniard Rafael Nadal beats Stan Wawrinka of Switzerland 6–2, 6–3, 6–1; becomes first man to win French title 10 times
  • Jun 26 America's Cup: Emirates Team New Zealand defeat Oracle Team USA 7-1 in Bermuda, Peter Burling (26) youngest ever helmsman
  • Jul 16 Wimbledon Men's Tennis: Roger Federer beats Marin Čilić 6-3, 6-1, 6-4 for a record 8th Wimbledon men's title
  • Jul 22 South African golfer Branden Grace records lowest round for a men's major championship - 62 in 3rd round at British Open, Royal Birkdale, England
  • Aug 3 Brazilian soccer forward Neymar transfers from FC Barcelona to Paris Saint-Germain for a world-record transfer fee of €222M on a 5-year deal
  • Sep 19 New MLB record for most home runs in a season, no. 5,694 hit by Alex Gordon of the Kansas City Royals
  • Nov 8 Brazilian surfer Rodrigo Koxa breaks the world record for surfing the biggest-ever wave at 24.4m at Nazaré, Portugal
  • Dec 5 Russia is banned from the next Winter Olympics in South Korea over state-sponsored doping

Did You Know?

World's longest recorded rainbow - 8 hrs 58 min in Taipei's Yangmingshan mountain range

On November 30 , 2017

Famous People Born in 2017

  • Jun 6 Alexander and Ella Clooney, twin children of actor George and human rights lawyer Amal Clooney, born in London

Famous People Who Died in 2017

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Would You Believe?

First footage of white giraffes posted by Hirola Conservation Program in north eastern Kenya

On August 2 , 2017

2017 in Pictures

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Boulder Glacier Melting

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Inflatable Trump-like Chicken

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Hurricane Irma

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Brainless Jellyfish that Sleeps

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Robert Mugabe Ousted

Famous weddings in 2017.

  • Jan 8 Dutch-American "Dancing with the Stars" pro Louis Van Amstel (44) weds American health coach Joshua Lancaster (27) in Sundance, Utah
  • Feb 4 American singer-songwriter Lyle Lovett (59) weds April Kimble in Harris County, Texas
  • Feb 11 Actor Bug Hall (32) weds Jill Marie DeGroff in Encino, California

Famous People in 2017

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World Leaders in 2017

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SON TARTIŞMALAR

  1. 2017 Events

    Trump’s inauguration: After a divisive election season, Donald Trump officially became the 45th President of the United States on January 20, 2017. In a 16-minute inaugural address (the shortest...

  2. 17 stories that defined 2017

    Hurricane season in 2017 was particularly brutal for the southeastern U.S. and Caribbean. Hurricane Harvey left a path of destruction in Houston and surrounding areas of Texas as well as...

  3. Historical Events in 2017

    2017 Historical Events in 2017 Home Events by Year 2017 2017 Jan uary Feb ruary Mar ch Apr il May Jun e Jul y Aug ust Sep tember Oct ober Nov ember Dec ember Highlights Events Birthdays Deaths Weddings & Divorces Events 1 - 200 of 843

  4. 2017

    2017 ( MMXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2017th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 17th year of the 3rd millennium and the 21st century, and the 8th year of the 2010s decade.

  5. Year 2017 Calendar

    Full Moon. 3rd Quarter. Disable moonphases. Some holidays and dates are color-coded: Red –Federal Holidays and Sundays. Gray –Typical Non-working Days. Black–Other Days. Local holidays are not listed. The year 2017 is a common year, with 365 days in total.

  6. 2017 Calendar

    United States Legal Federal Holidays 2017 Download the printable 2017 calendar with holidays. Download the following calendars for free to print at home or at work. The available file formats are PDF (Adobe Reader PDF) and JPG (Figure). 2017 calendar with holidays 2017 calendar without holidays 2017 month calendar

  7. 2017 in the United States

    Events in the year 2017 in the United States . Contents 1 Incumbents 1.1 Federal government 1.2 Governors 1.3 Lieutenant governors 2 Events 2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 June 2.7 July 2.8 August 2.9 September 2.10 October 2.11 November 2.12 December 3 Deaths 3.1 January 3.2 February 3.3 March 3.4 April 3.5 …

  8. Feature Film, Released between 2017-01-01 and 2017-12-31 ...

    1. Blade Runner 2049 (2017) R | 164 min | Action, Drama, Mystery 8.0 Rate this 81 Metascore Young Blade Runner K's discovery of a long-buried secret leads him to track down former Blade Runner Rick Deckard, who's been missing for thirty years. Director: Denis Villeneuve | Stars: Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling, Ana de Armas, Dave Bautista

  9. 2017 Honda Accord Specs, Price, MPG & Reviews

    The 2017 Honda Accord is a five-seat mid-size car that's available as a coupe or a sedan. It competes with the Toyota Camry, Nissan Altima and Ford Fusion, among others. The 2017 Honda Accord...

  10. 2017 Lexus IS Prices, Reviews, & Pictures

    There are nearly 170 listings on our site for the 2017 Lexus IS, with prices ranging from roughly $28,900 to $42,000. The average list price is about $34,500. Prices vary depending on the vehicle's condition, mileage, features, and location. See the Best Used Car Deals ».

  11. 2017 Comedy Movie Releases

    2017 Comedy Movie Releases 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 January February March April May June July August September October November December Unconfirmed Release Dates January 2017 January 27,...

  12. Income and Poverty in the United States: 2017

    The official poverty rate in 2017 was 12.3 percent, down 0.4 percentage points from 12.7 percent in 2016. This is the third consecutive annual decline in poverty. Since 2014, the pov­erty rate has fallen 2.5 percent­age points, from 14.8 percent to …

  13. 2017 Ford Taurus Prices, Reviews, & Pictures

    How Much Is the 2017 Ford Taurus? Our site has about 860 listings for the 2017 Ford Taurus, with prices ranging from $18,800 to $27,500. The average list price is $22,400, which is a couple thousand dollars lower than most rivals’ average list prices. See the Best Used Car Deals ».

  14. Year 2017 Calendar

    Red –Bank Holidays and Sundays. Blue –Common Local Holidays. Green –Local Holidays. Gray –Typical Non-working Days. Black–Other Days. The year 2017 is a common year, with 365 days in total. Calendar shown with Monday as first day of week. Change to Sunday.

  15. 2017 Buick Regal Prices, Reviews, & Pictures

    2017 Buick Regal Interior How Many People Does the 2017 Buick Regal Seat? The 2017 Buick Regal is a four-door sedan with seating for five. The seats are comfortable and supportive, even on lengthy trips. The front bucket seats in the GS trim are exceptionally plush and well-bolstered.

  16. Year 2017 Calendar

    2023 Calendar for Year 2017 (Canada) Holidays and Observances: Add more holidays/observances: Local holidays | Optional Holiday | De Facto Holiday | Major Christian Select: Tools Years with Same Calendar as 2017 Customization Forms Customize this calendar–large – advanced form with more choices Customize this calendar – classic, …

  17. What Happened in 2017

    Famous Weddings in 2017. Jan 8 "Dancing with the stars" pro Louis Van Amstel (44) weds health coach Joshua Lancaster in Utah. Feb 4 American singer-songwriter Lyle Lovett (59) weds April Kimble in Harris County, Texas. Feb 11 Actor Bug Hall (32) weds Jill Marie DeGroff in Encino, California.

  18. 2017 BMW X6 Prices, Reviews, & Pictures

    2017 BMW X6 Dimensions BMW X6 Cargo Space . Cargo space in the 2017 X6 is only 26.6 cubic feet, and folding down the rear seat gives you just 59.7 cubic feet. Both numbers are among the lowest in the luxury midsize SUV class. A hands-free liftgate is available. 2017 X6 Length and Weight . Where Was the 2017 BMW X6 Built?

  19. Best of 2017 Mix

    Best of 2017 Mix⬙ FAVOURITES ON SPOTIFY ⬙⇥ http://mrsuicidesheep.com/favourites⬙ Best of 2017 Mix on Spotify ⬙⇥ http://mrsuicidesheep.com/bestofmix2017All ...

  20. 2017 Mazda Mazda6 Prices, Reviews, & Pictures

    Though its price when new is one of the lowest among midsize cars, a used Mazda6 can be more expensive than buying a 2017 Hyundai Sonata , 2017 Kia Optima, or 2017 Toyota Camry. The average price of a 2017 Mazda6 is $19,100, based on more than 900 listings on our used car site. Factors such as trim level, vehicle condition, mileage, …